Abstract

The industry's renewed expansion has resulted in a rapid influx of talented new geoscientists into the world of integrated geological and geophysical interpretations. A dramatic difference this time around is that the industry is no longer relying on the super majors to serve as the training ground for new hires. Large and even modest-sized independents are hiring entry-level geoscientists at an aggressive pace, attempting to address the widely anticipated departure of seasoned oil and gas professionals to join newly formed companies, and, increasingly, to retirement. The attrition of highly experienced oil finders comes at a particularly difficult time, leaving the ranks of those who can fill the critical mentoring roles increasingly thin. Thus, the opportunity for hands-on learning with a trusted resource to look over your shoulder is decreasing as practical, effective industry training becomes ever more critical.

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