At about 10 p.m. on the first day of October 1915, some 200 km west of Reno, Nevada, the U.S.A.’s Biggest Little City, and 100 km or so north of our nation’s Loneliest Highway, the sky was cold and moonless. And in this particular location of the arid and sparsely settled Basin and Range, as is generally the case, absolutely nothing happened. The next day was different though. It was then, only nine years after the great 1906 California earthquake, that Nevada’s contributions to earthquake science began. After a couple of quite strong earthquakes in the late afternoon, things had...

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