During the summer of 1984 I had the pleasure of spending a few months working at Newberry Volcano in central Oregon. The work involved preparing for the first major test of a new technique designed to image the shallow velocity and attenuation structure of the summit region of the volcano. A dense network of seismic sensors was to be installed about the volcano to record twelve chemical explosions detonated at distances of 3-85 km from the volcano. The recorded arrival times and associated attenuation of the waveforms would later be used to derive structural models of the volcano.1

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