ABSTRACT

An application of dynamic dislocation theory gives the elastodynamic radiation resulting from the sudden occurrence of an earthquake due to faulting. The fault plane is visualized as a geometrical discontinuity across which there exists a sudden discontinuity in either one component of the strain tensor or one component of the displacement vector. It is shown that there are eight independent models, if unilateral faulting is assumed; and an argument is presented to demonstrate the likelihood that unilateral faulting does not exist in nature. For bilateral faulting the eight independent models are reduced in number to five. Of these five, two are more likely to occur in nature than the others. One of these, the displacement dislocation model, has a first-motion radiation pattern formally identical with that of a double couple in an unfaulted medium. The second, the shearstrain dislocation model, has a first-motion radiation pattern formally identical with that of an isolated force in an unfaulted medium. The latter type of mechanism may occur in deep-focus earthquakes. Another type of radiation, corresponding to the single couple in an unfaulted medium, results from the sudden release of shear strain in a laminar region.

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