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Issues

ISSN 0895-0695
EISSN 1938-2057

OPINION

Seismological Research Letters July 31, 2019, Vol.90, 1717-1718. doi:10.1785/0220190159
Seismological Research Letters July 31, 2019, Vol.90, 1719-1720. doi:10.1785/0220190158
Seismological Research Letters July 31, 2019, Vol.90, 1721-1722. doi:10.1785/0220190167

FOCUS SECTION

Seismological Research Letters August 14, 2019, Vol.90, 1723-1725. doi:10.1785/0220190173
Seismological Research Letters July 31, 2019, Vol.90, 1726-1739. doi:10.1785/0220190009
Seismological Research Letters July 24, 2019, Vol.90, 1740-1747. doi:10.1785/0220180394
Seismological Research Letters April 03, 2019, Vol.90, 1748-1755. doi:10.1785/0220180398
Seismological Research Letters April 24, 2019, Vol.90, 1756-1766. doi:10.1785/0220180399
Seismological Research Letters August 07, 2019, Vol.90, 1767-1778. doi:10.1785/0220190107
Seismological Research Letters May 22, 2019, Vol.90, 1779-1791. doi:10.1785/0220180391
Seismological Research Letters May 01, 2019, Vol.90, 1792-1800. doi:10.1785/0220180396
Seismological Research Letters June 26, 2019, Vol.90, 1801-1811. doi:10.1785/0220190032
Seismological Research Letters May 22, 2019, Vol.90, 1812-1819. doi:10.1785/0220180395
Seismological Research Letters May 01, 2019, Vol.90, 1820-1835. doi:10.1785/0220180384

ARTICLES

Seismological Research Letters August 07, 2019, Vol.90, 1836-1843. doi:10.1785/0220190079
Seismological Research Letters August 07, 2019, Vol.90, 1844-1858. doi:10.1785/0220190102
Seismological Research Letters July 17, 2019, Vol.90, 1859-1875. doi:10.1785/0220180272
Seismological Research Letters August 21, 2019, Vol.90, 1876-1888. doi:10.1785/0220190127
Seismological Research Letters July 31, 2019, Vol.90, 1889-1901. doi:10.1785/0220190048
Seismological Research Letters July 31, 2019, Vol.90, 1902-1915. doi:10.1785/0220190110
Seismological Research Letters August 21, 2019, Vol.90, 1916-1922. doi:10.1785/0220180375
Seismological Research Letters July 03, 2019, Vol.90, 1923-1936. doi:10.1785/0220190065
Seismological Research Letters August 21, 2019, Vol.90, 1937-1949. doi:10.1785/0220190097
Seismological Research Letters August 21, 2019, Vol.90, 1950-1970. doi:10.1785/0220190081
Seismological Research Letters August 14, 2019, Vol.90, 1971-1986. doi:10.1785/0220180294
Seismological Research Letters July 10, 2019, Vol.90, 1987-1993. doi:10.1785/0220180345
Seismological Research Letters July 17, 2019, Vol.90, 1994-2004. doi:10.1785/0220190024
Seismological Research Letters August 21, 2019, Vol.90, 2005-2014. doi:10.1785/0220190096

EASTERN SECTION

Seismological Research Letters August 21, 2019, Vol.90, 2015-2027. doi:10.1785/0220180388

ELECTRONIC SEISMOLOGIST

Seismological Research Letters June 26, 2019, Vol.90, 2028-2038. doi:10.1785/0220180314
Seismological Research Letters August 07, 2019, Vol.90, 2039-2045. doi:10.1785/0220190072

EDUQUAKES

Seismological Research Letters July 24, 2019, Vol.90, 2046-2050. doi:10.1785/0220190054

DATA MINE

Seismological Research Letters August 07, 2019, Vol.90, 2051-2057. doi:10.1785/0220190094

SSA ANNUAL MEETING REPORT

Seismological Research Letters August 14, 2019, Vol.90, 2058-2090. doi:10.1785/0220190170

MEETING CALENDAR

Seismological Research Letters August 14, 2019, Vol.90, 2091. doi:10.1785/0220190192

ERRATA

Seismological Research Letters August 07, 2019, Vol.90, 2092-2093. doi:10.1785/0220190182
Seismological Research Letters August 21, 2019, Vol.90, 2094. doi:10.1785/0220190189
  • Cover Image

    Cover Image

    issue cover

    Front: In remote regions of Alaska and northwestern Canada, bears are regular visitors to seismic stations, and Tape et al. (this issue) document their visits at three recent projects. Evidence gathered suggests that remote stations are visited by bears more regularly than non-remote stations, and that data losses because of bears are minor (<5%) and occur exclusively at remote stations. The authors propose that the threat of damage from bears to a station increases with the remoteness of the site and the density of bears, and it decreases with the strength and security of materials used to protect the station. They suggest that the installation of low-power electric fences be considered for seismic stations, especially for temporary experiments, to protect the equipment and to protect the bears.

    Back: The American subduction zones, stretching more than 8000 km from Mexico to southern Chile and covering ∼5000 km in the eastern Caribbean, lead to earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanic eruptions that threaten the region’s large and growing population. An unprecedented amount of data from recent seismic events and deployments has given rise to new ideas about seismic rupture, subduction geometry, triggered events, nonvolcanic tremors, and the earthquake cycle. In this issue of SRL, the Focus Section on Subduction Zone Processes in the Americas presents 10 original articles that address these new developments as part of an international effort to connect researchers and ideas along the Latin America subduction zone. The illustration, from Chao et al. (this issue), shows some of the subduction features in this expansive region.

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