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Eastern Section Meeting Reports

WEDNESDAY MORNING 
 U. S. Earthquakes I (M. Sibol and J. Ebel, Chairmen) 
0830 Preliminary results from integration of stratigraphic and geophysical observations in the central South Carolina coastal plain, Muthana, A., Talwani, P., and Colquhoun, D. 
0845 Detailed field study of a potential paleoliquefaction site near Cottageville, South Carolina, Collingsworth, K. and Talwani, P. 
0900 Characterization of seismically-induced liquefaction sites associated with the 1886 Charleston, S.C. earthquake, Amick, D. C. and Maurath, G. 
0915 Consistency of faulting in the southern Appalachians, Johnston, A. C. and Everett, S. L. 
0930 Is there evidence that a large earthquake may be expected in the northeastern United States sometime soon? Maybe yes and maybe no, Ebel, J. 
0945 DISCUSSION 
1000 BREAK 
1030 Lateral velocity heterogeneity beneath the southern Appalachians as revealed from teleseismic P-delays, Root, G. L. and Chung, W.-Y. 
1045 Quantification of differences in attenuation of Modified Mercalli intensity between eastern and western North America - Preliminary results, Sibol, M. S. and Bollinger, G. A. 
1100 Focal mechanism solutions for north Georgia and southeastern Tennessee earthquakes (1982–1987), Zelt, K.-H., and Long, L. T. 
1115 The mbLg 4.2 Vonore, Tennessee earthquake of 27 March 1987 aftershock sequence: Main shock and macroseismic effects, Nava, S. J., Johnston, A. C., and Reinbold, D. 
1130 The mbLg 4.2 Vonore, Tennessee earthquake of 27 March 1987 aftershock sequence: a 3 km × 3 km source area, Munsey, J. W., Nava, S. J., and Johnston, A. C. 
1145 Seismicity and Tectonics in the Wyoming Foreland, Gordon, D. W. 
1200 LUNCH 
WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 
National Network and Developments in Instrumentation (D. Russell and P. Ward, Chairmen) 
1320 A national seismic network for the United States, Masse, R. P. 
1340 Can the regional seismic networks benefit from national seismic network technology?, Buland, R. 
1400 A science plan for a national seismic system, Heaton, T. 
1420 Economical seismic-network processing, Ward, P. L., and Cuttler, R. 
1440 A regional network with distributed capabilities for New York state, Johnson, D. H., Simpson, D. W., and Kentrichia, D. 
1505 BREAK AND OPEN DISCUSSION OF NATIONAL NETWORK 
1530 The PANDA seismic array, Chiu, J. M., Steiner, G. C., and Johnston, A. C. 
1545 The role of a portable, audio frequency (>20 Hz), small aperture seismic array as part of a national broad-band satellite telemetered seismograph network, Cranswick, E. 
1600 A procedure for calibrating short-period telemetered seismic systems, Chapman, M. C., Snoke, J. A., and Bollinger, G. A. 
1615 Random binary calibration techniques, Russell, D. R., Haug, E. J., and Herrmann, R. B. 
1630 Ground motion instrumentation and data acquisition at the National Center for Earthquake Engineering Research, Johnson, D. H. 
1645 Moment tensor inversion for local earthquake data - applied to eight aftershocks of the Mammoth lakes sequence 1980, Koch, K. 
1700 Procedural abstraction of a knowledge based system, an example from seismology. Patnaik, G. B. 
1830 REFRESHMENTS - CUPPLES HOUSE 
1930 BANQUET - CUPPLES HOUSE - AWARD OF SSA MEDAL TO OTTO NUTTLI 
THURSDAY MORNING (S. Alexander and J. Armbruster, Chairmen) 
U. S. Earthquakes II 
0830 Earthquakes, injection wells and the Perry nuclear power plant, Cleveland, Ohio, Ahmad, M. U. 
0845 The July 1987 Ashtabula earthquake (mb = 3.6) sequence in northeastern Ohio and a deep fluid injection well, Armbruster, J. G., Seeber, L., and Evans, K. 
0900 Source parameters of the southern Illinois earthquake of . . . 
WEDNESDAY MORNING 
 U. S. Earthquakes I (M. Sibol and J. Ebel, Chairmen) 
0830 Preliminary results from integration of stratigraphic and geophysical observations in the central South Carolina coastal plain, Muthana, A., Talwani, P., and Colquhoun, D. 
0845 Detailed field study of a potential paleoliquefaction site near Cottageville, South Carolina, Collingsworth, K. and Talwani, P. 
0900 Characterization of seismically-induced liquefaction sites associated with the 1886 Charleston, S.C. earthquake, Amick, D. C. and Maurath, G. 
0915 Consistency of faulting in the southern Appalachians, Johnston, A. C. and Everett, S. L. 
0930 Is there evidence that a large earthquake may be expected in the northeastern United States sometime soon? Maybe yes and maybe no, Ebel, J. 
0945 DISCUSSION 
1000 BREAK 
1030 Lateral velocity heterogeneity beneath the southern Appalachians as revealed from teleseismic P-delays, Root, G. L. and Chung, W.-Y. 
1045 Quantification of differences in attenuation of Modified Mercalli intensity between eastern and western North America - Preliminary results, Sibol, M. S. and Bollinger, G. A. 
1100 Focal mechanism solutions for north Georgia and southeastern Tennessee earthquakes (1982–1987), Zelt, K.-H., and Long, L. T. 
1115 The mbLg 4.2 Vonore, Tennessee earthquake of 27 March 1987 aftershock sequence: Main shock and macroseismic effects, Nava, S. J., Johnston, A. C., and Reinbold, D. 
1130 The mbLg 4.2 Vonore, Tennessee earthquake of 27 March 1987 aftershock sequence: a 3 km × 3 km source area, Munsey, J. W., Nava, S. J., and Johnston, A. C. 
1145 Seismicity and Tectonics in the Wyoming Foreland, Gordon, D. W. 
1200 LUNCH 
WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 
National Network and Developments in Instrumentation (D. Russell and P. Ward, Chairmen) 
1320 A national seismic network for the United States, Masse, R. P. 
1340 Can the regional seismic networks benefit from national seismic network technology?, Buland, R. 
1400 A science plan for a national seismic system, Heaton, T. 
1420 Economical seismic-network processing, Ward, P. L., and Cuttler, R. 
1440 A regional network with distributed capabilities for New York state, Johnson, D. H., Simpson, D. W., and Kentrichia, D. 
1505 BREAK AND OPEN DISCUSSION OF NATIONAL NETWORK 
1530 The PANDA seismic array, Chiu, J. M., Steiner, G. C., and Johnston, A. C. 
1545 The role of a portable, audio frequency (>20 Hz), small aperture seismic array as part of a national broad-band satellite telemetered seismograph network, Cranswick, E. 
1600 A procedure for calibrating short-period telemetered seismic systems, Chapman, M. C., Snoke, J. A., and Bollinger, G. A. 
1615 Random binary calibration techniques, Russell, D. R., Haug, E. J., and Herrmann, R. B. 
1630 Ground motion instrumentation and data acquisition at the National Center for Earthquake Engineering Research, Johnson, D. H. 
1645 Moment tensor inversion for local earthquake data - applied to eight aftershocks of the Mammoth lakes sequence 1980, Koch, K. 
1700 Procedural abstraction of a knowledge based system, an example from seismology. Patnaik, G. B. 
1830 REFRESHMENTS - CUPPLES HOUSE 
1930 BANQUET - CUPPLES HOUSE - AWARD OF SSA MEDAL TO OTTO NUTTLI 
THURSDAY MORNING (S. Alexander and J. Armbruster, Chairmen) 
U. S. Earthquakes II 
0830 Earthquakes, injection wells and the Perry nuclear power plant, Cleveland, Ohio, Ahmad, M. U. 
0845 The July 1987 Ashtabula earthquake (mb = 3.6) sequence in northeastern Ohio and a deep fluid injection well, Armbruster, J. G., Seeber, L., and Evans, K. 
0900 Source parameters of the southern Illinois earthquake of . . . 

Seismological Research Letters October 01, 1987, Vol.58, 87-89. doi:https://doi.org/10.1785/gssrl.58.4.87

Minutes of the 59th annual meeting of the Eastern Section of the Seismological Society of America, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri: October 7–9, 1987.

I. The Executive Committee held its annual meeting Tuesday evening, October 6, 1987 at 2000. The following were in attendance:

R. B. Herrmann Chairman 
A. J. Murphy Vice-Chairman 
W. J. Person Treasurer 
P. Talwani Secretary 
G. A. Bollinger Fifth Member 
A. C. Johnston Technical Editor 
W. A. Rinehart Publication Editor 
D. Gordon Auditing Committee 
R. B. Herrmann Chairman 
A. J. Murphy Vice-Chairman 
W. J. Person Treasurer 
P. Talwani Secretary 
G. A. Bollinger Fifth Member 
A. C. Johnston Technical Editor 
W. A. Rinehart Publication Editor 
D. Gordon Auditing Committee 

The meeting was called to order by the chairman. Minutes of the last meeting were read an approved as published in Earthquake Notes Vol 57, No. 4. The treasurers report (attached) was read and approved.

The chairman reported a decision made to use a glossy paper for the interior of Seismological Research Letters starting with Vol. 58, No. 3.

Discussion of the appearance of Seismological Resarch Letters was directed by the chairman. The committee approved the directives for page format proposed. Guidance for author prepared copy was also approved. Page charges continue to be $25 per printed page, irrespective of whether the paper is author prepared. The incentive for author prepared copy is quicker publication.

Format for published abstracts of section meetings was also discussed. For the purpose of legible, useful published abstracts, the abstract format will continue to be as at present, except that the layout of the author prepared abstract will be 5.0 inches wide rather than 6.0 inches.

The publication editor reported that the backlog in the publication . . .

Seismological Research Letters October 01, 1987, Vol.58, 108-110. doi:https://doi.org/10.1785/gssrl.58.4.108

PREAMBLE

Article 1 - The name of this ASSOCIATION shall be the EASTERN SECTION of the SEISMOLOGICAL SOCIETY of AMERICA

Article 2 - The specific and primary purposes for which this association is formed are to disseminate educational material and conduct research relating to earthquakes and allied phenomena, and to engage in other charitable, educational, and scientific activities. The general purposes and powers are as permitted by law and that are necessary to, incidental to, or in furtherance of the specific and primary purposes.

Article 3 - The place where the principal office for the transaction of the business of the association is located in Jefferson County, State of Colorado.

Article 4 - The Rules and Regulations of the EASTERN SECTION of the SEISMOLOGICAL SOCIETY of AMERICA shall be the creating document of the association.

RULES AND REGULATIONS

Section 1 - The Constitution of the Seismological Society of America provides for the authorization of sections of the Society, prescribes in general how sections shall be organized, and states how such sections shall be related to the Society. The following Rules and Regulations shall serve only as a guide to the officers of the Eastern Section and its Executive Committee in the execution of their duties.

Officers

Section 2 - The Constitution of the Seismological Society of America specifies that a Section shall have an Executive Committee consisting of five members of the Society, four of whom shall be officers of the Section: namely, a Chairman, Vice-Chairman, Secretary, and Treasurer. The . . .

Seismological Research Letters October 01, 1987, Vol.58, 141-143. doi:https://doi.org/10.1785/gssrl.58.4.141

EARTHQUAKES, INJECTION WELLS AND THE PERRY NUCLEAR POWER PLANT, CLEVELAND, OHIO

AHMAD, Moid U., Professor of Hydrogeology, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701

On January 31, 1986, an earthquake of magnitude 4.9 occurred about 11.3 km south of the Calhio injection wells. Accelerometers on site at the Perry Nuclear Power Plant (PNPP) recorded accelerations as high as 0.19 to 0.23 g. A large number of instruments tripped due to high amplitude vibrations. There seems to be a possible correlation between abnormally high annulus pressures and the time of earthquakes. This same correlation extends to the two 1983 earthquakes recorded in the area. Micronetworks have recorded 6 earthquakes around the injection well with focal depths ranging from 0.5 to 2.2 km. A hydrological model of an anisotopic reservoir 6.44 km wide and 17.7 km long indicates a pressure build up between 53 bars at the epicenter and 118 bars at the injection well. The simulation matched average yearly pressure data and displayed a good correlation. The assumption of an anisotropic reservoir is consistent with available geophysical and geological data. The indicated pressure buildup is similar in magnitude to that resulting in the Denver earthquake of 1962. This critical value is interpreted as the pressure buildup above which induced earthquakes may occur in this area.

TRAVERTINE AS AN INDICATOR OF NEOTECTONIC DEFORMATION IN THE LANCASTER, PA SEISMIC ZONE AND OTHER AREAS

ALEXANDER, S.S., STOCKAR, D., and THORNTON, C.P., Department of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802

The vicinity of Lancaster, Pennsylvania . . .

Seismological Research Letters October 01, 1987, Vol.58, 90-107. doi:https://doi.org/10.1785/gssrl.58.4.90
Seismological Research Letters October 01, 1987, Vol.58, 111-117. doi:https://doi.org/10.1785/gssrl.58.4.111
Seismological Research Letters October 01, 1987, Vol.58, 119-124. doi:https://doi.org/10.1785/gssrl.58.4.119
Seismological Research Letters October 01, 1987, Vol.58, 125-133. doi:https://doi.org/10.1785/gssrl.58.4.125

INTRODUCTION

In January of 1987, in conjunction with the Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling (COCORP) Mississippi embayment survey, we recorded a small portion of the COCORP Vibroseis®1 sources using single-component analog MEQ-800 and three-component digital DR-100 portable recording systems. This limited field experiment was designed to test the feasibility of using the Vibroseis seismic sources and a portable earthquake recording system to probe the crustal structures.

DATA ACQUISITION

The locations of the experiment are shown in Figure 1 along with COCORP line 1 which is an east-west line starting near the western boundary of the Mississippi embayment. The field recording was carried out on two different sites along the COCORP line. Site 1 (indicated by the small square in Figure 1) is about 20 km south of Jonesboro, Arkansas, and site 2 (indicated by the large square) is in the vicinity of Marked Tree which was the probable center of one of the three great New Madrid earthquakes that occurred in the winter of 1811–1812 (Nuttli, 1973). The COCORP source parameters are given in Table 1. The recording geometries used at sites 1 and 2 are shown in Figure 2. Receivers were placed along the COCORP line at site 1 and perpendicular to the line at site 2. The majority of the geophones were planted in moist to muddy soil. During the operation, all of the receivers remained fixed while five Vibroseis trucks moved towards the receivers. The maximum recording apertures for sites 1 and 2 were about 4 and . . .

Seismological Research Letters October 01, 1987, Vol.58, 135-139. doi:https://doi.org/10.1785/gssrl.58.4.135
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