Peter Skelton, ed., 2003, Cambridge University Press, New York, 360 p., (Hardcover, US $110.00, Softcover US $50.00) ISBN: Hardcover: 0-521-83112-1; Softcover; 0-521-53843-2.

One of the major transformations in the general thrust of geoscientific research has been an increasing emphasis on global change and its offshoot, Earth systems science. Although the roots of this change—I hesitate to call it a revolution—were laid earlier, this approach to investigating Earth and its processes became prevalent during the 1980s. It offered the geosciences as a whole a common theme around which to concentrate research and to justify increased funding. It also became viewed as...

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