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The Pleistocene Fuji–Einstein system in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico consists of a shelf-edge delta that is directly linked to and coeval with two submarine channel–levee systems, Fuji and Einstein. There is a continuous transition between the channel fills and the delta clinoforms, and the seismic reflections of the prodelta are continuous with the levee deposits. Five smaller delta lobes within the Fuji–Einstein delta formed through autocyclic lobe switching that was superimposed on a single falling-to-rising sea-level cycle. The corresponding stratigraphic complexity is difficult to interpret in single downdip seismic sections, especially where elongated mudbelts are attached to some of the delta lobes. The two slope channel systems, Fuji and Einstein, deeply incise the shelf-edge delta. However, late-stage delta progradation was coeval with slope-channel development, and, as a result, there is no easily mappable, single erosional surface separating channel deposits from deltaic sediments. During early delta-lobe development, a gully field forms on the upper slope, directly downdip from the delta lobe. As the delta progrades, one of the larger gullies in the middle of the field captures most of the denser flows and gradually evolves into a sinuous channel. The larger delta-related slope channels source 2–4 km-wide submarine aprons where they encounter areas with lower gradients. If the slope gully or channel remains active for a long enough time, its corresponding submarine apron smooths out the slope and becomes incised by the later bypassing flows. The well-preserved and mappable 3D shelf-edge architecture provides a rare opportunity to understand relationships between deltaic and slope depositional systems.

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