Skip to Main Content
Skip Nav Destination

The role of palynology in the exploration for oil is essentially comparable to that of any other branch of paleontology. Advantages and limitations of spores, pollen, algae, miscellaneous protistans of uncertain or known affinity, and other similar-sized microfossils utilized in palynology as stratigraphic and paleoecologic indicators are briefly reviewed. The economic value of this relatively modern scientific field to the petroleum industry may be increased and hastened by avoiding some of the pitfalls which plagued micropaleontology in its earlier years of application. Information should be developed simultaneously on the biology, ecology and stratigraphy of these organisms.

Palynologists now being trained should be encouraged to develop their knowledge of both geologic and biologic fundamentals. Research in this field should be sponsored by industry, as well as by universities and government agencies, in both its own research laboratories and in private or university labs. The areas of this research should include: studies of the distribution and preservation of palynomorphs in modern sediments; relative significance of living assemblages or transported entities to other types of organisms with which they are found; development of methods and programs for mechanical classification of these micro-fossils and analysis, evaluation, storage and retrieval of data concerning them; improvement of techniques for separating these fossils from the rocks; development of environmental information by the study of types and conditions of preservation, origin and significance of reworked fossils, relative percentages of spores and pollen to other organisms, and characteristics of their role in sedimentation.

You do not have access to this content, please speak to your institutional administrator if you feel you should have access.
Close Modal

or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal