Skip to Main Content

Issues

ISSN 1470-9236
EISSN 2041-4803
In this Issue

Photographic feature

Quarterly Journal of Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology March 19, 2018, Vol.51, 301-310. doi:10.1144/qjegh2017-081
Quarterly Journal of Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology May 11, 2018, Vol.51, 311-317. doi:10.1144/qjegh2017-047

Review article

Quarterly Journal of Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology March 23, 2018, Vol.51, 318-329. doi:10.1144/qjegh2017-121

Research article

Quarterly Journal of Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology March 23, 2018, Vol.51, 330-337. doi:10.1144/qjegh2017-098
Quarterly Journal of Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology April 30, 2018, Vol.51, 338-351. doi:10.1144/qjegh2017-091
Quarterly Journal of Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology April 30, 2018, Vol.51, 352-364. doi:10.1144/qjegh2017-037
Quarterly Journal of Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology May 22, 2018, Vol.51, 365-378. doi:10.1144/qjegh2017-112
Quarterly Journal of Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology April 30, 2018, Vol.51, 379-386. doi:10.1144/qjegh2017-136

Technical note

Quarterly Journal of Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology April 30, 2018, Vol.51, 387-398. doi:10.1144/qjegh2017-027

Book review

Quarterly Journal of Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology May 11, 2018, Vol.51, 399-400. doi:10.1144/qjegh2018-063
Quarterly Journal of Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology June 29, 2018, Vol.51, 401. doi:10.1144/qjegh2018-082
Quarterly Journal of Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology June 12, 2018, Vol.51, 402. doi:10.1144/qjegh2018-074
  • Cover Image

    Cover Image

    issue cover

    Salinity testing of a groundwater fed watering hole in Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Isiolo District, Laikipia County, north-central Kenya. Maasai counterparts are investigating water chemistry to determine the hydro-chemical signature, origin, recharge processes and travel times of a groundwater fed perennial watering hole, as part of a conservancy-wide water scarcity assessment and resilience planning initiative in the northern foothills of Mount Kenya, following severe droughts in the region. Springs discharging from Pleistocene basalts on the northern flank of Mount Kenya support year round stream flows and wetland ecosystems, which sustain one of the largest black and white rhino populations in East Africa, in addition to more than 300 zebra, 500 elephants, innumerable wildebeest and gazelle, as well as more than 40 wild cats including lions, cheetahs and leopards. The springs and local boreholes also provide drinking water supplies to more than 6000 people living within and around the conservancy.

    http://www.lewa.org/who-we-are/about-lewa/

    Photograph by: C. Carpenter, GWP Consultants LLP.

  • PDF Icon PDF LinkFront Matter
  • PDF Icon PDF LinkTable of Contents
  • PDF Icon PDF LinkBack Matter
Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal