Abstract

The residential development of Limnes in Pissouri, Cyprus was constructed on a slope formed by a pre-historic landslide. Reactivated ground movements within this landslide, first noticed by residents in 2012, continue to cause significant damage to property. The rates of movement, already observed to be accelerating between 2014 and 2017, increased by up to a factor of three during and following the very wet winter of 2018–19. The outcome has been a marked increase in architectural and structural damage to some properties, as well as building rotation in the both vertical and horizontal planes. An interpretation of the most recent InSAR results suggests that the area behind the back scarp may also now be undergoing displacement and this, to an extent, is borne out by observed cracking to some buildings and paved surfaces in the vicinity. Uncertainties remain over the depth(s) of sliding and the groundwater regime within the landslide mass that can only be resolved through further ground investigation and subsurface monitoring.

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