Now that the marine sulfur cycle has been studied for many decades, we are tempted to think that we understand the most important aspects and only need to wrap up the details. Then we are surprised by unexpected and refreshing discoveries, such as the electron conductance through cable bacteria, or electron transfer between bacteria and archaea and solid minerals such as magnetite or greigite. At the interface between geochemistry and microbiology we realise how microorganisms are involved in many geochemical processes, such as pyrite formation, and thereby affect the pathways of sulfur transformation and the sulfur isotope signals they leave...

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