graphicHILAL AYDIN is an assistant professor at Manisa Celal Bayar University, Department of Biology, Turkey. She earned her PhD at Ege University, Fisheries Faculty, Hydrobiology section (Turkey). Her research interests include phytoplankton ecology, organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst phylogeny, distribution and effecting environmental factors.

graphicKARA BOGUS is a staff scientist with the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) at Texas A&M University (College Station, TX, USA). She earned her PhD (marine geosciences) from the University of Bremen (Bremen, Germany). Her research interests include using organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts in palaeoceanographic studies, and cyst wall chemical composition and its application to both environmental reconstructions and diagenesis of sedimentary organic carbon.

graphicMANUEL BRINGUÉ is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of South Carolina (USA), and a visiting fellow at the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences (SEOS), University of Victoria. After he completed his BSc at the Université du Québec à Rimouski, and his MSc at the Institut des Sciences de la Mer de Rimouski (ISMER-UQAR), Manuel obtained his PhD at the University of Victoria (Canada). His research focuses on the calibration of dinoflagellate cysts as palaeoenvironmental proxies, and high-resolution reconstructions of oceanographic and climatic conditions during the Holocene.

graphicCONSUELO CARBONELL-MOORE is a retired oceanographer, researching the morphology of tropical dinoflagellates at Oregon State University, in Corvallis, Oregon, USA. She has described several new genera and species of dinoflagellates. Her main focus is the study of the family Podolampadaceae Lindemann as well as rare dinoflagellates found in deep waters (shade species) in different tropical areas of the world’s oceans.

graphicNICOLAS CHOMÉRAT is a researcher at Ifremer, Laboratoire Environnement Ressources Bretagne Occidentale (LER BO), Concarneau, France. He received his PhD in 2005 from the University of Aix-Marseilles, France. His research interests are the taxonomy, evolution, phylogeny and biogeography of dinoflagellates, with a particular emphasis on benthic species.

graphicTOMASA DEL CARMEN CUÉLLAR is a PhD student at the Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnologia, Unidad Academica Mazatlán, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. Her research interests are about phytoplankton and harmful algae blooms in coastal lagoons and reconstruction of past harmful algal blooms using dinoflagellate cyst records in sediments.

graphicBARRIE DALE is professor emeritus at the Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Norway. He received his PhD from The Open University, UK, in 1988. Research interests include developing a better understanding of the ecology of living dinoflagellate cysts for applications in phytoplankton ecology, harmful algal blooms, environmental studies, and palaeoenvironmental interpretations from the fossil record.

graphicMARIANNE ELLEGAARD is a professor at Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Her research focus is on the interphase between living and fossil dinoflagellates as well as on marine phytoplankton in general. She thus works on cyst–theca relationships, dinoflagellate phylogeny and evolution, marine resting stage seed banks, and diatom biology.

graphicSVETLANA ESENKULOVA is a biologist at the Pacific Salmon Foundation. She leads the phytoplankton research component for the Salish Sea Marine Survival Project. Her study assesses the effects of phytoplankton dynamics in the Strait of Georgia on salmon survival through bottom-up (food web) and top-down (harmful algal blooms) processes. Svetlana completed her MSc at the University of Victoria and was one of the first MSc students of Dr Vera Pospelova.

graphicFRÉDÉRIQUE EYNAUD is an associate professor at the University of Bordeaux in the Department of Earth Sciences and Environments and in the EPOC laboratory (Oceanic and Continental Environments and Paleoenvironments). She obtained her PhD in 1999 from University of Bordeaux 1. Her researches are focused on the combined use of dinoflagellate cyst and planktonic foraminifera to reconstruct past oceanic conditions and their link to climate changes through the Quaternary.

graphicSHANNON FERGUSON is a PhD candidate in the Department of Geology and Geophysics, and serves as Curatorial Assistant to Sophie Warny at the Museum of Natural Science, both at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, USA. In 2012 she received her MS in geology from Louisiana State University, under the direction of Sophie Warny, researching brackish dinoflagellate species from the Black Sea MIS 5-1. She is currently studying the history of Holocene climate, vegetation, and coastal morphological changes in Texas using palynology.

graphicARJEN GROTHE is a postdoctoral researcher at Utrecht University. He received his PhD in 2016 at the Laboratory of Palaeobotany and Palynology at Utrecht University. His research focuses on stratigraphy and palaeoclimatology of the Paratethys Sea (i.e. Black and Caspian Seas) from the Eocene to Pliocene, with a special emphasis on the late Miocene.

graphicHAIFENG GU is a professor at the Third Institute of Oceanography, China. He received his PhD in 2007 from the Ocean University of China. His research interests are the taxonomy and evolution of dinoflagellates.

graphicPIETER R. GURDEBEKE is teaching assistant of palaeontology and a PhD candidate (MSc geology in 2012) at the Department of Geology of Ghent University. He studies late Quaternary environmental changes and palaeoceanography in fjord systems of western Canada by means of assemblages of dinoflagellate cysts, other palynomorphs and geochemistry.

graphicMARTIN J. HEAD is a professor of earth sciences at Brock University in Canada, a position he has held since 2005. He was previously at the University of Cambridge, UK, and before that the University of Toronto where he maintains an affiliation. His interests include late Cenozoic stratigraphy, palaeoceanography, and marine palynology, and particularly the late Cenozoic record of dinoflagellate cysts and acritarchs. Martin holds a PhD from the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.

graphicMAIJA HEIKKILÄ is a postdoctoral researcher at the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland and a visiting scientist at the Environmental Change Research Unit (ECRU), University of Helsinki. Maija received her PhD from the University of Helsinki in 2010. Her research is focused on high-latitude environmental and palaeoenvironmental change, in particular on the responses of species and biotic communities to climate change.

graphicMARYSE HENRY Maryse Henry is a lab technician working at the Department of Earth and Atmospheric sciences of the Universitè du Quèbec à Montrèal (UQAM). She is an expert in palynological preparations and dinoflagellate cyst identification.

graphicMAłGORZATA KUCHARSKA is a PhD student at the Institute of Oceanology of the Polish Academy of Sciences, using dinoflagellate cysts in palaeoecological research on Svalbard. She received her master’s degree in oceanography from the University of Gdańsk, studying recent ecosystem changes in the Baltic Sea. In addition to dinoflagellate cysts, she has also used foraminifera and diatoms in her research activities.

graphicAUDREY LIMOGES is an assistant professor at the University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, Canada. After completing her PhD in 2015 from Université du Québec à Montréal, she worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen, Denmark. Her research activities are motivated by questions regarding the impact of natural environmental and anthropogenic changes on aquatic systems. Specialised in Quaternary organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts, she uses diverse biogeochemical proxies for reconstructions of past environmental conditions.

graphicLAURENT LONDEIX is an associate professor at the University of Bordeaux in the Department of Earth Sciences and Environments and in the EPOC laboratory (Oceanic and Continental Environments and Paleoenvironments). He obtained his PhD in 1990 from University of Bordeaux 1 conducted jointly with EXXON EPR.E on Lower Cretaceous dinocysts and sequence stratigraphy. His research interests include palaeoecology, palaeoclimate change and palaeoceanographic reconstructions using dinoflagellate cysts (mainly in Mediterranean and adjacent seas: i.e. Messinian Salinity Crisis, Last Deglaciation, Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE2)), biostratigraphy (Lower Cretaceous, Miocene, Pliocene) and taxonomy. He is also involved in preservation and enhancement of the geological heritage.

graphicSTEPHEN LOUWYE is a professor of palaeobotany and palynology at Ghent University, Belgium. He received his MSc in 1984 and his PhD in 1990, both from Ghent University. After several postdoctoral positions he was appointed professor in 2002. His research interests are the Neogene palynology of the North Atlantic and the North Sea Basin, sequence stratigraphy and palaeoclimatology.

graphicFABIENNE MARRET is an associate professor (reader) in the School of Environmental Sciences at the University of Liverpool. She is a palynologist by training, with research interests in the field of Quaternary palaeoceanography and palaeoecology. She received her PhD in 1994 from the University of Bordeaux, France. She studies marine sediments from around the world to interpret past environmental changes, based on vegetation tracers (pollen grains) and sea-surface conditions (dinoflagellate cysts). She is particularly interested in the causes of abrupt climate changes during the Quaternary periods, from the tropics to the poles.

graphicEDWIGE MASURE is retired from the Université Pierre et Marie Curie and the Unité Mixte de Recherche 7207, and the CR2P (Centre de Recherche sur la Paléobiodiversité et les Paléoenvironnements) of Paris, France, where she was ‘Ingenieur de Recherche’. She received her PhD and her habilitation from the Université Pierre et Marie Curie in botanical and palaeontological palynology (cycads) and on the evolution of dinoflagellate cysts, respectively. Her research focused on the evolution of dinoflagellate cysts through their morphological evolution with respect to molecular phylogenetic trees, taxonomy, and Mesozoic and Cenozoic biostratigraphy and palaeoenvironments. She was interested in studying Cretaceous palaeoceanography and palaeoclimate using the global distribution of dinoflagellate cysts to detect the environmental factors (temperature, salinity) controlling their geographical distribution.

graphicKAZUMI MATSUOKA is a professor emeritus at Nagasaki University. Although retired since 2013, he continues his scientific research on fossil and modern dinoflagellates, in particular cyst–motile form relationships of both naked and thecate dinoflagellates.

graphicJENS MATTHIESSEN is a senior scientist at the Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) in Bremerhaven, Germany. He received his PhD in 1991 from Christian-Albrechts-University in Kiel. His research is focused on the palaeoecology and stratigraphy of Quaternary and Neogene aquatic palynomorphs in the high northern latitudes, and the glaciation history and palaeoceanography of the Arctic Ocean.

graphicKENNETH NEIL MERTENS is a researcher at Ifremer, Laboratoire Environnement Ressources Bretagne Occidentale (LER BO), Concarneau, France. He received his PhD in 2009 from Ghent University. His research interests are the taxonomy, evolution, phylogeny and biogeography of dinoflagellates, and the palaeoceanographical application of dinoflagellate cysts, particularly in the Quaternary and Neogene.

graphicNICOLAS VAN NIEUWENHOVE is a visiting researcher at the University of New Brunswick (Fredericton, Canada). He graduated as geologist/palaeontologist from Ghent University (Belgium) in 2004 and received his PhD in 2008 from the Christian-Albrechts-Universität and the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Kiel (Germany). As researcher at GEOMAR, the Université du Québec à Montréal (Canada), Aarhus University (Denmark) and the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (Copenhagen, Denmark), he has been studying the palaeoceanography of the northern North Atlantic during the last two interglacials, using dinocysts and other microfossil and sedimentary tracers.

graphic For 35 years, PETA MUDIE has studied the Pliocene–Recent palynology of Mediterranean seas, including the Arctic Ocean, first as a postdoctoral student at Dalhousie University, then as a research scientist with the Geological Survey of Canada, combined with joint adjunct appointments at Memorial University of Newfoundland and Dalhousie University. Her field work includes four seasons on an ice island in the Canadian Arctic, work on Arctic icebreakers and ocean drilling ships, and International Geological Correlation Program excursions to Neogene–Pleistocene type sections around the Black Sea.

graphicAURÉLIE PENAUD is a lecturer at the University of Brest (Université de Bretagne Occidentale (UBO), Institut universitaire européen de la mer (IUEM), Plouzané, France) since 2010. Her interests concern the multi-proxy investigation of marine sediment cores including dinoflagellate cyst assemblages but also geochemical analysis (stable isotopes, alkenones), so as to discuss the Quaternary climate variability and especially the abrupt climate events that occurred over the last 50 ka BP and during the Holocene, in the North Atlantic from temperate to tropical latitudes and in the Western Mediterranean Sea.

graphicVERA POSPELOVA is a professor at the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences (SEOS), University of Victoria, Canada. She received her PhD in 2003 from McGill University (Canada). Vera’s research interests include: taxonomy of late Quaternary dinoflagellate cysts; cyst production, ecology, and seasonal and annual dynamics in coastal waters; applications of dinoflagellate cysts as indicators of water quality conditions, with an emphasis on pollution and eutrophication in North American estuaries; and high-resolution palaeoceanographic reconstructions using sedimentary archives.

graphicÉRIC POTVIN is a postdoctoral researcher at the Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI). He received his BSc in biology from Université du Québec à Rimouski (Canada), his MSc in biological oceanography from the Institut des sciences de la mer de Rimouski-Université du Québec à Rimouski (Canada), and his PhD in microbial ecology from Seoul National University (South Korea). Éric is interested in the understanding of marine plankton diversity, function, strategy, and ecology. He has previously worked on the taxonomy of recent dinoflagellate cysts, life cycle of dinoflagellates, seasonal dynamics in coastal areas, and interactions with dinoflagellates as well as their physiology.

graphicANDREA PRICE is a postdoctoral researcher at Louisiana State University in the Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences. She received her PhD from McGill University in 2016. Her main research interests include using dinoflagellate cysts as indicators of water quality in North American estuaries, the seasonality of cyst production, and the use of cysts in Quaternary palaeoceanographic studies.

graphicTAOUFIK RADI is a lecturer in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric sciences of the Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada. He received his PhD in environmental sciences from the Université du Québec à Montréal in 2007. For the last two decades, he has been studying the dinocyst distribution in modern sediments of the mid-high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere, especially the North Pacific Ocean. His research focuses also on Quaternary dinocyst taxonomy, data treatments and numerical analyses of dinocyst populations.

graphicSOFIA RIBEIRO is a research scientist at the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland. She obtained her PhD in 2011 from the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Her research interests include the ecology and evolution of marine protists, the reconstruction of past climate and environments using biogenic tracers, and ocean–climate–human interactions, particularly in the North Atlantic and Arctic regions.

graphicKEITH RICHARDS is a palynologist with over 25 years’ experience working on Cenozoic and Mesozoic sediments from all parts the world, with a particular interest in tropical Cenozoic palynology, sequence stratigraphy and deltas. He completed an MSc at Hull University on West African Holocene pollen. He is a palynologist with KrA Stratigraphic Ltd. in the UK and is a research associate at the Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED) at the University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, working on the palynology of the Caspian Sea region.

graphicANDRÉ ROCHON is a professor at the Institut des Sciences de la Mer de Rimouski, Université du Québec à Rimouski (ISMER-UQAR), and has studied the marine palynology of Pleistocene, Holocene and Modern sediments of the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans for the last 25 years. He also recently began working on dinoflagellate cyst assemblages in the South Atlantic Ocean along the Argentinian coastline and in Brazilian waters. His expertise includes the use of dinoflagellate cysts as proxy indicators of sea surface conditions and as invasive species in ballast water and sediment, cyst–theca relationships, algal culturing and distribution of dinoflagellates in Arctic phytoplankton.

graphicFRANCESCA SANGIORGI is a senior lecturer at the University of Utrecht, the Netherlands, in the Marine Palynology and Paleoceanography group, Department of Earth Sciences. She obtained her PhD in marine palynology and palaeoceanography at the University of Bologna (Italy). She is specialised in Cenozoic marine palynology and leads or is involved in several projects, including International Ocean Drilling Project (IODP) Expeditions, mostly dealing with Cenozoic climate evolution and Neogene circum-Mediterranean environments. She is interested in modern dinoflagellate cyst ecology as a tool to reconstruct anthropogenic impact and eutrophication in coastal areas.

graphicSTIJN DE SCHEPPER is a principal scientist at Uni Research Climate and the Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research in Bergen, Norway. He obtained his PhD from the University of Cambridge (UK) in 2006. His research interests include Neogene to Quaternary dinoflagellate cyst biostratigraphy, palaeoecology, palaeoceanography, Arctic sea ice evolution and climate during past warm times.

graphicMICHAEL SCHRECK is currently is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Geosciences at the Arctic University of Norway (Tromsø), where he utilises Miocene–Pliocene dinoflagellate cysts for palaeoenvironmental and palaeoceanographic reconstructions. He received his PhD from the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research and the University of Bremen (Germany) in 2012. His research interest is focused on various aspects of Neogene dinoflagellate cysts and acritarchs, and their application for palaeoclimate reconstructions in the high northern latitudes and the Arctic Ocean.

graphicVLADIMIR TORRES is a palynologist with over 10 years of experience in the Cenozoic and Mesozoic record from different sedimentary basins around the world. He completed his bachelor’s degree in geology at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia in Bogotá, and his PhD in palynology at the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands. Currently, he is working as a biostratigrapher and stratigrapher for ExxonMobil in Houston, Texas.

graphicSERDAR UZAR has a PhD from Manisa Celal Bayar University in Turkey. He graduated as marine biologist in 2015 and studied dinoflagellate cyst distribution with relation to sea surface conditions in İzmir Bay, which is one of the most polluted bays of the Turkish coastal waters. He has been researching various environmental factors and their impact on modern dinoflagellate cyst distribution in different areas of Turkish coastal waters: the Black Sea, Marmara Sea, Aegean Sea and Mediterranean Sea. He has been involved in studies regarding dinoflagellate cyst–theca relationships and potentially harmful/toxic dinoflagellate cyst distribution in these areas.

graphicANNE DE VERNAL is a professor at the Department of Earth and Atmospheric sciences of the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM). She obtained her PhD from the Université de Montréal in 1986. Her research work deals with the use of micropalaeontological tracers, notably dinocysts, for the reconstruction of climate and ocean changes in mid and high latitudes, with emphasis on the late Cenozoic.

graphicGERARD VERSTEEGH combines organic geochemistry, palynology and palaeobotany to assess organic matter degradation, and, through this, to elucidate present and past environment and evolution. In 1995 he received his PhD in biology at Utrecht University on palynology and the onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciations. He expanded his expertise with organic geochemistry at the Netherlands Institute for Sea Research. At the Université de Lille 1, France, he was an invited professor in 2007 and 2008 and obtained a prestigious Heisenberg Fellowship from the German Science Foundation in 2009. Currently he is at the Alfred-Wegener-Institute in Bremerhaven and the Centre for Marine Environmental Research, Bremen University. His interests include the macromolecular composition of palynomorphs, selective degradation of organic matter, the Palaeozoic terrestrialisation, (sub)recent Mediterranean environmental change, proxy development, lipids, acritarchs and dinoflagellates.

graphicHENK VRIELINCK is an associate professor at the Solid State Sciences Department of Ghent University in Belgium. He obtained his master of science in engineering physics (1996) and his PhD in sciences: physics (2001) from Ghent University. His research focuses on defects in solids (insulators and semiconductors) and spectroscopy – Fourier-transform infrared and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in particular.

graphicSOPHIE WARNY is an associate professor of palynology in the department of Geology and Geophysics and the Curator of Palynological Collection at the Museum of Natural Science (MNS), both at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. She received her PhD from the Université Catholique de Louvain in Belgium, working under the direction of Dr Jean-Pierre Suc. She is the director of the AASP – The Palynological Society Center for Excellence in Palynology (CENEX). CENEX focuses on various aspects of Mesozoic and Cenozoic palynological research including biostratigraphic studies in collaboration with the oil and gas industry, palaeoceanography and palaeoclimate reconstruction, and forensic research.

graphicEUN JIN YANG is a research scientist at the Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI). She received her BSc in oceanography from Inha University (Republic of Korea), and her MSc and PhD in biological oceanography from the Inha University (Republic of Korea). She is interested in the understanding of the marine plankton ecology and food web interaction. She has studied planktonic food web processes in the Arctic Ocean (Chuckchi Sea) and Antarctic Ocean (Amundsen Sea).

graphicMAREK ZAJACZKOWSKI is a palaeoceanographer at the Institute of Oceanology Polish Academy of Sciences (IOPAS), based in Sopot, Poland. He received his MSc degree in geography from the University of Gdansk and worked as assistant to Prof. Jan Marcin Weslawski at IOPAS (1986–2000). He received his PhD degree at University of Gdansk in 2000, after which he began working as a senior scientist at IOPAS, and was awarded his habilitation and the degree of doktor habilitowany (a Polish postdoctoral degree) in the field of earth sciences and the discipline of oceanology in 2011. Since then, he has worked in the capacity of professor at IOPAS, leading and developing the Laboratory of Paleoceanography, a new organisational unit at the Institute. His research interests are focused on climate/sea environmental changes in the European Arctic after the last glaciation using sedimentological and micropalaeontological (foraminifera) proxies. His greatest achievements, however, have been entering into co-operation with Prof. Jan Pawłowski and his team at the University of Geneva and adding to his scientific laboratory new, world-renowned methods for reconstructing fossil foraminifera DNA.

graphicSÉBASTIEN ZARAGOSI is an associate professor at the University of Bordeaux in the Department of Earth Sciences and Environments and in the EPOC laboratory (Oceanic and Continental Environments and Paleoenvironments). He obtained his PhD in 2001 from University of Bordeaux 1. As a sedimentologist, he investigates the link between climate changes and sedimentary neritic to abyssal contexts.

graphicKARIN ZONNEVELD is a senior scientist at the Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen, Germany, where she leads the Marine Palynology Division in the Department of Marine Micropalaeontology. She received her PhD from the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands, and her habilitation from the University of Bremen. Her research is multidisciplinary, and combines marine palynology with biological and geological palaeoceanography, environmental science and organic geochemistry. The focus of her research is on the application and development of marine palynomorphs, notably dinoflagellate cysts, as tools to establish palaeoenvironmental and palaeoceanographic reconstructions. In particular, Karin is interested in the effects of variable environmental conditions on the geographical distribution, preservation and production of palynomorphs. The work on preservation levels includes studying the effects of early diagenetic processes on the organic geochemical characteristics of palynomorphs.

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