Chemical weathering, or the breakdown of rock to form regolith, occurs within an interface between the highly dynamic atmosphere and the comparably quiescent bedrock boundary known as the Critical Zone (Amundson et al. 2007; Anderson et al. 2007). The Critical Zone hosts a complex biosphere that redistributes water and nutrients while injecting carbon into the regolith as gas, dissolved compounds and less soluble organic matter. Most of this injected carbon reacts with mineral surfaces and is either exported as bicarbonate to rivers, and ultimately the ocean, or stored in newly formed secondary minerals. Simultaneously, tectonic forces push...

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