Kinoite, Cu2Ca2Si3O10±2H2O, a new species from the northern Santa Rita Mountains, Pima County, Arizona, occurs as single crystals and in veinlets associated with apophyl-lite, native copper, and copper sulfide minerals. It was found in drill cores which cut skarn developed in a Paleozoic limestone sequence.

X-ray crystallographic data include: a = 6.990 ± .004, b = 12..890±.003, c = 5.654±.002 Å; /3 = 96°05’±04’; V = 507.097 Å3; space group, P21/m. Strongest powder diffraction lines are 4.72 (10), 3.052 (8), 6.441 (7), 2.116 (4), 3.138 (3), 2.951 (3), 2.315 (3), and 2.078 (2) Å.

It is monoclinic with a:b:c = .542:1:.439, and β = 96°05’. Crystal morphology is dominated by [hk0] and crystals are tabular in the b-c plane. {011} is commonly present although terminal forms are poorly developed. It exhibits excellent {010} cleavage and distinct {100} and {001} cleavages. It is deep azurite blue and transparent to translucent. Measured density is 3.16±.03; the calculated value is 3.193 g/cm3 with Z = 2. Hardness is about 5 on the Mohs scale. Crystals are optically (—); 2V = 68°; α = 1.638 (pale greenish blue), β = 1.665 (blue), γ= 1.676 (deep blue). Z˄c near 0°,X = b,r<v distinct.

The mineral is named for Fr. Eusebio Francisco Kino (1645—1711), celebrated Jesuit pioneer of the southwestern United States.

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