The Canary Islands are one of the most fascinating magmatic provinces on Earth. They occupy a complex tectonic setting at the boundary between the African continental crust and the Atlantic oceanic crust, the magmatism being triggered by a number of mantle melting anomalies which, unusually, have been roughly fixed for ≥7 Ma. Points of particular interest include the fact that, despite relative proximity, each of the islands has a separate evolutionary history. Two islands, Gran Canaria and Tenerife, contain the largest volumes of evolved rocks on any oceanic volcano; Gran Canaria boasts the huge (20 × 35 km) Miocene Tejeda...

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