In 1978, publication of The Wolfson Geochemical Atlas of England and Wales, which showed the spatial distribution of concentrations of nineteen elements in the fine-grained (<0.177 mm) sieved fraction of samples of ~50,000 active stream sediments, collected at a spatial density of ~1 sample per 2.5 km2 over the whole of England and Wales where surficial drainage was present, established proof-of-concept of the multi-element regional geochemical atlas as a tool capable of providing geochemical data reflecting changes in bedrock geology and overburden, as well as both natural and anthropogenic sources of pollution. It represented the culmination of a...

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