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Resolving Quaternary Tectonic Activity with High-Resolution Data in Space and Time

  • Submission deadline: 30 July 2021
  • Lead Editor: Zhikun Ren, Institute of Geology, China Earthquake Administration, China
  • Guest Editors:
    • Olaf Zielke, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Saudi Arabia
    • Marie-Luce Chevalier, Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, China
    • Edwin Nissen, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, Canada
    • Huiping Zhang, Institute of Geology, China Earthquake Administration, China

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Description

Strong earthquakes are one of the most dangerous natural disasters with potentially devastating effects on society and critical infrastructure across the globe. In order to better understand earthquakes, active tectonics research quantifies crustal deformation throughout a fault's earthquake cycle by studying geomorphic and stratigraphic evidence of recent and past earthquakes. The underlying assumption in this approach is that a fault’s current and previous seismic behaviour is representative of its likely future behaviour. Constraining a fault’s seismic behaviour in such a manner requires high-resolution geomorphic and stratigraphic records that enable us to resolve the spatial and temporal characteristics of co-, post-, and inter-seismic phases, potentially over multiple earthquake cycles.

Recent technological developments have dramatically increased not only the amount and resolution of topographic and geophysical survey data sets, but also our ability to date stratigraphic units and geomorphic surfaces. These technological advances have enabled us to better understand the interplay between crustal deformation, earthquake ruptures, and their signature in geomorphic and stratigraphic records. In particular, the availability of high-resolution data sets from LiDAR, SfM, or geophysical surveys, as well as the use of accurate dating methods such as cosmogenic or OSL dating, allow us to quantitatively study surface deformation at high spatial resolution over large areas and at multiple time scales – from a few years to millions of years. In recent years, the development of analogue and numerical modelling methods has also allowed us to better constrain geomorphic deformation and its temporal evolution at higher resolutions. This may also contribute to the development of active tectonics studies and geomorphic evolution at high-resolution 4D.

This Special Issue will focus on the tectonic activity of active faults and the geomorphic processes in various tectonic regimes worldwide utilizing high-resolution spatial data and/or dating approaches. Contributions to the issue should synthesize the methodology of using high-resolution data in active tectonics and tectonic geomorphology studies as well as provide new observational and modelling constraints for a particular studied region. Sub-themes within the issue include, but are not limited to, active tectonics, earthquake geology, remote sensing, quaternary dating, as well as numerical and analogue modelling.

  • Active tectonics – quantitatively studying surface deformation at high spatial resolution over large areas and at multiple time scales
  • Earthquake geology – resolving the spatial and temporal characteristics of co-, post-, and inter-seismic phases of past earthquakes as they are expressed in geomorphic and stratigraphic records
  • Remote sensing – high-resolution data sets from LiDAR, SfM, or geophysical surveys
  • Tectonic geomorphology – understanding the link between active tectonics and topographic evolution
  • Quaternary dating – application or improvement of quaternary dating methods such as cosmogenic or OSL dating
  • Modelling to better constrain the geomorphic deformation and evolution at higher resolution through analogue and numerical modelling methods

Papers are published upon acceptance.

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