Abstract

Plant successional trends are discussed as a means of stratigraphic correlation, based on palynomorph distributions. A succession is defined as replacement of one floral community by another in a given area. Changes in community composition follow changes in environment; consequently palynological evidence of floral changes can be expected in the sedimentary rock section. The degree to which successions are recorded and interpretable in a sedimentary sequence is effected by depositional environments, palynological productivity of plants, dispersal mechanisms, mixing, reworking, and many other complicating factors. These principles are applied in a case study of two Desmoinesian coals.

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