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The period 1965–2000 saw the concept of applying geomorphology to a range of environmental and engineering problems become a more mainstream activity. The refinement and development of new techniques in mapping, remote sensing, and hazard and risk assessment allied to the increased use of quantitative methods of measurement and analysis enabled geomorphologists to provide data that were directly relevant to all aspects of infrastructure and general land-use planning, as well as many facets of the construction industry. One application that emerged was the need to compile geomorphological data as part of a process of collecting all Earth science information to underpin national, regional and local land-use planning. Understanding fluvial and coastal processes and landforms was important for river and shoreline management, where to this day there remain many conflicting land-use requirements and ongoing discussions over the nature, extent and suitability of any proposed mitigation measures. The other main application was in civil engineering, where geomorphologists worked alongside engineering geologists and geotechnical engineers in the collection and interpretation of ground information data to assist in natural hazard identification and quantifying the risks associated with them, as well as supporting safe and economic design of civil engineering structures.

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