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This chapter reviews the progress made between the years 1965 and 2000 in temporal techniques and their importance for the study of landforms. The chapter begins with discussion of advances in chronostratigraphy and of the important contributions to geomorphology that came from palaeoenvironmental reconstruction, notably through the study of marine sediments and ice cores. A more detailed discussion then follows of developments and advances in dating methods, grouped by radiometric and radiometric-related, incremental, age-equivalent markers, and relative, with emphasis on the ways in which the new techniques opened up new avenues in the study of landforms.

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