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During deposition of the Jubaila-Arab-Hith sequences, the most important Arab-D reservoir, the Arab-C to A reservoirs and the Arab and Hith anhydrite seals were formed. The Kimmeridgian Jubaila-Arab-D transgression (MFS J70) restored and expanded the intrashelf basin geometry. The restored basin was filled by deeper subtidal Jubaila facies, which graded upwards to the Arab-D reservoir facies. In the late stages the Arab-D facies included both basin rim shoal facies and at least one large isolated shoal surrounded by ‘lagoonal’ intrashelf basin remnants interconnected by accessway channels. This differentiation was facilitated by local structural growth of a few metres. The Arab-D reservoir is overlain by the Arab-D anhydrite, deposited initially as gypsum in broad salinas, which blanketed the intrashelf basin region, forming the first major seal. By the end of Arab-D anhydrite deposition, the entire intrashelf basin area had been filled and transformed into a broad evaporite platform. Atop this platform, the Arab-C to -A (MFS J80-100) alternating shallow water carbonate and anhydrite (initially gypsum) intervals were deposited, ending regionally with the thick Hith Anhydrite Formation. The depositional setting for each of the main Jubaila-Arab-Hith sequences is reviewed and illustrated. The evolution of Jubaila-Arab-D reservoir models is discussed. Different interpretations of Jubaila-Arab-D-Hith sequences are compared, including the issue of whether the Arab carbonate-evaporite depositional sequence boundaries should be taken at the top of the carbonate intervals or the top of the anhydrites. Examples are included which illustrate how easterly palaeowind directions were an important factor controlling Arab-D facies variation. A scenario is presented to show how the Late Jurassic Tethys shelf uplift and low angle unconformity coupled with westward structural tilt were important. An alternating balance developed between the evolving land barrier and eustatic sea-level change during deposition of the Arab carbonate–evaporites and the Hith Anhydrite. Carbonates were deposited when the barrier was inundated and evaporites when the barrier was exposed and the area restricted and hypersaline. A major late Tithonian flooding event (MFS J110) formed the top-Hith Manifa carbonate reservoir and brought open marine carbonate mud-rich deposition to the area, continuing without hiatus into the Early Cretaceous.

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