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Salt is sensitive to the geometry of the substrate it flows across. We use physical models to investigate the impact of base-salt relief on deformation patterns. First, we investigate early-stage gravity gliding across base-salt relief. Salt flowing onto structural high blocks forms a zone of thickened salt and associated shortening owing to a flux mismatch. On the downdip edge of the basement high another flux mismatch generates a topographic monocline (ramp-syncline basin) with associated extensional and contractional hinges. With multiple base-salt high blocks, this structural pattern was repeated down the entire slope. Laterally discontinuous base-salt relief generated additional complexities such as major rotations of raft blocks and intervening diapirs as salt is channelled around and between base-salt relief. At the allochthonous level, regional dip, salt budget and base-salt relief influence flow patterns. Individual salt sheets spread sub-radially with streamlines skewed down the regional slope. As the canopy coalesced along allosutures, inward flow from the canopy peripheries dominated, driven by more vigorous flow from outer feeders owing to less competition for source-layer salt. Subsequent shortening returned flow patterns to grossly dip-parallel. However, salt flows fastest where it is thickest and thus chains of feeders channel rapid intracanopy flow.

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