Abstract

It has become a custom in this Society, fixed by formal observances of more than half a century and by the example of a long line of elders, to the number now of more than fifty, for the President of the year to deliver an address closing his administration. As to content or method of treatment there seems to have been no rule. A review of the titles indicates that the larger number have chosen topics representing their major life-time interests. Only a few are philosophical, although there are many such observations tucked away in others. An occasional one has the evident purpose of bringing an important current problem or policy into the limelight, while more rarely a forward look either for the good of the organization or for the advancement of the science may be discerned.

Only three are missing—that of James D. Dana in 1890, that of . . .

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