Recognizing terminal ridge subduction is of first-order importance in chronicling the tectonic timeline of any accretionary orogens, but remains elusive in the final suturing zone of the Paleo-Asian Ocean along the Solonker−Xar Moron−Changchun−Yanji swath. Here we report two generations of ultramafic-mafic to intermediate intrusions from northern Liaoning, North China, linking eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt and northern North China Craton. The ca. 259 Ma appinites show variable enrichment in large-ion lithophile elements (LILEs) but depletion in high-field strength elements (HFSEs), and variably enriched isotopic compositions with εNd(t) of −11.8 to −2.4 and zircon εHf(t) of −15.7 to +5.0. These petro-geochemical traits argue for their derivation from partial melting of subduction-modified lithospheric mantle. By contrast, the high-Mg diorites of 226−223 Ma display decoupling features between LILEs and HFSEs and juvenile isotopic signatures with εNd(t) of −0.3 to +2.6 and zircon εHf(t) of +5.4 to +11.4. These characters are consistent with a magmatic origin from partial fusion of sediment-fertilized asthenospheric mantle. Synthesizing the two mantle-melting events with regional coeval igneous activities leads to the identification of Late Permian (265−250 Ma) and Middle-Late Triassic (241−218 Ma) magmatic flare-ups with a 10−15 m.y. lull along the northern North China Craton. This magmatic tempo tends to record a salient mantle replacement from hydrous metasomatized lithosphere to anhydrous asthenosphere. In combination with ensuing progressive crustal growth, simultaneous metamorphism, and structural activities, these diverse manifestations make a compelling case of ridge subduction and concomitant slab window formation during the eventual closure of the Paleo-Asian Ocean along the Solonker−Xar Moron−Changchun−Yanji swath.

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