Abstract

Students used Brunton compasses to measure the angles of repose in fresh sand and gravel talus exposed in artificial pits in a kame terrace near Willimantic, Connecticut. The angle of repose was found to average 33.08°, and is independent of exposure direction or material type. Measurements also were made on natural forested hillslopes of the same sand and gravel along a terrace scarp where the Nachaug River had cut into it. The hillslope averages 41.29° and is independent of exposure direction. The difference between the angle of repose and the natural hillslope is attributed to the stabilizing influence of the forest vegetation.

First Page Preview

First page PDF preview
You do not currently have access to this article.