Abstract

Introduction.*

During my work at Cambridge with Professor Davis attention has been directed to shorelines and the forms which are systematically developed during successive stages of shore evolution along the common border of the land and sea. It was early seen that a distinction is needed between the oldland, all those preexisting portions of more or less wasted formations, and the newer land, the coastal plain, which borders and is composed of the detritus from the oldland. In a similar manner a distinction is needed between the forms cut and those accumulated in the course of shore evolution. At the beginning of a cycle the waves attack the coast at all points, cutting or nipping back the initial form of the land into a cliff; while at a later stage transportation of material alongshore begins and the waste from the edge and bottom of the land, together with the river . . .

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