SOIL CONSERVATION, WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO NEW ENGLAND CONDITIONS

BY HENRY R. ADAMS

The thesis of soil conservation is that soil is a natural resource fundamental to human life, which, under proper use and treatment, can be permanently maintained, but which otherwise may easily be impaired or destroyed.

The character of the soil influences both the use of the land and its susceptibility to damage. Therefore, the important soil features may be interpreted on “land use capability maps”, which show the recommended intensity of use and of management or treatment required to maintain the soil under that use.

Much of New England has a dense vegetative cover, either grass or trees, which protects soil from erosion, and retards fertility depletion. Recommended management practices should maintain or improve the vegetative cover while permitting the harvesting of the current growth.

Intensive tillage, as in the Connecticut Valley and Northern Maine, presents the . . .

This content is PDF only. Please click on the PDF icon to access.

First Page Preview

First page PDF preview
You do not currently have access to this article.