Abstract

INTRODUCTION

The island of Lanai, Hawaii, lies 59 miles southeast of Honolulu, Oahu, and 9 miles west of Lahaina, Maui. Its maximum north-south length is l3¼ miles, its east-west length 13 miles, and the area is 141 square miles. It is sixth in size of the islands of the Hawaiian Group (Fig. 1). The highest point is 3370 feet above sea level. The annual rainfall ranges from 36 inches at Lanaihale, on the summit, to about 9 inches at Keomuku, on the east shore. Only 11½ square miles receive more than 30 inches, and two-thirds of the island receives 15 inches or less. Only one perennial stream exists, and it does not reach the sea. The low rainfall and the small amount of erosion in late geologic time have combined to make conditions unusually favorable for the preservation of high marine deposits.

The shore lines described herein were discovered by . . .

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