Abstract

Introduction
MISUSE OF THE TERMS REEF AND CORAL REEF

In her monograph on the Dolomites of South Tyrol, Dr. Ogilvie-Gordon (′27) says, quoting Rothpletz, “The time has come when the term ‘reef,’ if it is to have any validity, must be given an exact definition.” Mojsisovics (′79), although he consistently employed the term reef for the Tyrolean structures, refused to add the designation coral, stating that, “In order not to admit into the designation a prejudicial theory, we have omitted the qualifying word ‘coral.’ ” In the light of recent studies his caution has been more than justified. Vaughan (′11) in 1911 suggested the following definition of coral reef: “A coral reef is a ridge or mound of limestone, the upper surface of which lies, or lay at the time of formation, near the level of the sea, and is predominantly composed of calcium carbonate secreted by organisms, of which . . .

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