Abstract

Introduction

Seven base maps of the world have recently been prepared and published by the American Museum of Natural History. These maps are primarily intended for plotting geographic and biologic data, both on the land areas of the globe and in the oceans. For this purpose several types of equal-area projections have been selected and an arrangement of continents sought, so that any undue distortion of form on one map is compensated on another.

Map-makers are always confronted with a problem impossible of solution when they are asked to represent the surface of a sphere on a flat sheet of paper. However, many devices have been invented for representing the surface of the globe on a plane. They are known as map projections. There are many world-map projections and all have serious defects. The shapes of large areas are distorted and the distances are shown at different scales on various . . .

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