Abstract

Introduction

Superficial disturbances of the country rock associated more or less with drift deposits are of common occurrence in glaciated regions, but are of especial interest in those areas where the strata are composed of comparatively soft outcrops of the Mesozoic and Cainozoic formations. Classical examples of such disturbances occur in Europe in the Island of Möen (6) and the coast sections at Lønstrup, Denmark (7); in the Isle of Rügen, Germany, and the Norfolk coast of Britain. Detailed study of these sections proves that the disturbed deposits have a definite tectonic structure, the repetition of deposits associated with thrust-planes producing beautiful examples of imbricate structure, or “Schuppen-Struktur,” due to obstruction to movement of an ice-sheet overloaded with englacial material.

Similar, but little-known, disturbances occur in Canada, in east-central Alberta, over a wide area of Upper Cretaceous strata; but, unlike the European examples, the disturbances occur in isolated and partially . . .

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