Abstract

Introduction

The great World War which has now come to a happy termination, through the triumph of the forces battling for justice and freedom over the powers of ruthless oppression, has been called “the war of the Age of the Natural Sciences.” We all know how the wonderful discoveries and inventions of the last few decades in physics and chemistry have been applied to the development of terrible and often cruel weapons or engines of war. All sciences have been called on. Even geology has had its field, not so much through discoveries as from the waging of an almost new type of warfare, which became dominant at times in many places.

The magnitude and extent of the struggle made the mineral resources of the world a critical factor in many directions. We have been told at this meeting of the ways in which the training of the economic geologist has . . .

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