Abstract

Introduction

Lake Minnewanka, or Devils Lake, is situated about 9 miles northeast of Banff, in the Rocky Mountains of western Alberta. The section was made along the northwest shore of the lake and continued westward across the Cascade River.

The following formations are included:

PERMIAN
 Feet 
Upper Banff shale; an alternation of heavy bedded, light gray calcareous sandstones and thin-bedded, dark gray arenaceous shales. Many Lingulse and pelecypods (as Schizodus) 1.200 
 Feet 
Upper Banff shale; an alternation of heavy bedded, light gray calcareous sandstones and thin-bedded, dark gray arenaceous shales. Many Lingulse and pelecypods (as Schizodus) 1.200 
PENNSYLVANIAN
Rocky Mountain quartzite; an alternation of light gray quartzite and light gray limestone. Euphemus carbonarius is very abundant in the upper portion 600 
Upper Banff limestone; light to dark gray limestone, usually thin-bedded. The lower portion is of Mississippian age 2,200 
Rocky Mountain quartzite; an alternation of light gray quartzite and light gray limestone. Euphemus carbonarius is very abundant in the upper portion 600 
Upper Banff limestone; light to dark gray limestone, usually thin-bedded. The lower portion is of Mississippian age 2,200 
MISSISSIPPIAN
 Feet 
Lower Banff shale; dark gray to black calcareous shale 1,300 
 Feet 
Lower Banff shale; dark gray to black calcareous shale 1,300 
DEVONIAN
Lower Banff limestone; heavy bedded, light gray limestone 1,000 
Intermediate limestone; alternating fine to coarse grained limestone 1,600 
Lower Banff limestone; heavy bedded, light gray limestone 1,000 
Intermediate limestone; alternating fine to coarse grained limestone 1,600 

The spiriferoids are distributed as follows. . .

First Page Preview

First page PDF preview
You do not currently have access to this article.