Abstract

Introduction

A few years ago I outlined* what to me appeared to be the proper policy to be pursued by the United States Geological Survey. A kindly critic said of it: “There will not be much left for others to do if all that you have planned is carried out.” Since that time the work of the Survey has progressed steadily along the lines then laid down, the only important exception being the study of the geology of public roads, which has been taken up by the Department of Agriculture; yet state surveys continue to flourish and expand, and any active, capable student or professor connected with school, college, or university may find more geologic problems close at hand than he can possibly investigate.

I am often asked by young men, “What are the prospects for me if I take up geology as a profession ? Is there work . . .

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