Documenting the kinematics of detachment faults can provide fundamental insights into the ways in which the lithosphere evolves during high-magnitude extension. Although it has been investigated for 70 yr, the displacement magnitude on the Northern Snake Range décollement in eastern Nevada remains vigorously debated, with published estimates ranging between <10 and 60 km. To provide constraints on displacement on the Northern Snake Range décollement, we present retrodeformed cross sections across the west-adjacent Schell Creek and Duck Creek Ranges, which expose a system of low-angle faults that have previously been mapped as thrust faults. We reinterpret this fault system as the extensional Schell Creek Range detachment system, which is a stacked series of top-down-to-the-ESE brittle normal faults with 5°–10° stratigraphic cutoff angles that carry 0.1–0.5-km-thick sheets that are up to 8–13 km long. The western portion of the Schell Creek Range detachment system accomplished ~5 km of structural attenuation and is folded across an antiformal culmination that progressively grew during extension. Restoration using an Eocene unconformity as a paleohorizontal marker indicates that faults of the Schell Creek Range detachment system were active at ~5°–10°E dips. The Schell Creek Range detachment system accommodated 36 km of displacement via repeated excision, which is bracketed between ca. 36.5 and 26.1 Ma by published geochronology. Based on their spatial proximity, compatible displacement sense, overlapping deformation timing, and the similar stratigraphic levels to which these faults root, we propose that the Schell Creek Range detachment system represents the western breakaway system for the Northern Snake Range décollement. Debates over the pre-extensional geometry of the Northern Snake Range décollement hinder an accurate cumulative extension estimate, but our reconstruction shows that the Schell Creek Range detachment system fed at least 36 km of displacement eastward into the Northern Snake Range décollement.

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