Abstract

The Kidd volcanic complex is composed of felsic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks of Archean age. The felsic rocks are intercalated with sedimentary rocks, and are in contact with komatiitic ultramafic rocks. Large diorite plutons were emplaced into the rhyolite, and the complex is overlain by younger basalts. Metasomatic events affecting the lithology of the Kidd volcanic complex include silicification, extensive CO2 metasomatism (carbonate), K-metasomatism (sericite-fuchsite), and chlorite and minor carbonate alterations. Petrographic evidence, supported by stable isotope and fluid inclusion studies, suggests that silicification and early carbonate alteration were synvolcanic, and therefore related to ore deposition. During subsequent extensive K-metasomatism, sericite precipitated in the rhyolite, and fuchsite precipitated in the ultramafic rocks. Although chlorite post-dates K-metasomatism, the micas and chlorite are both found in anastomosing microfissures, commonly occupying the same set of fractures.

Hydrothermal rutile formed by the breakdown of magnetiteilmenite during K-metasomatism and chlorite alteration gives an age of 2624 ±62 Ma (95% confidence level) by Pb-Pb isotopic measurements. It is therefore approximately 100 m.y. younger than syngenetic massive sulfide mineralization (2717 ±2 Ma). Sulfide stringers within sericite and chlorite veins suggest some remobilization of the ores during these later events. This alteration assemblage, generally thought to be intimately associated with mineralization, is identical to that found associated with many lode-gold deposits in the Superior province. Recent dating of micas and rutile associated with gold deposits in the Abitibi subprovince gives comparable ages to the rutile in the Kidd volcanic complex, which must therefore record a widespread, late hydrothermal event affecting mineralized rocks.

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