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The Vredefort granophyre dikes have long been recognized as being derived from the now-eroded Vredefort melt sheet. One dike, in particular, the Daskop granophyre dike, is notable for a high abundance of lithic clasts derived from various stratigraphic levels. In this study, we mapped the distribution of the clasts throughout the continuously exposed section of the dike using field mapping and aerial drone photography and attempted to constrain the emplacement mechanisms of the dike. We found that the clasts are not homogeneously spread but instead are distributed between clast-rich zones, which have up to 50% by area clasts, and clast-poor zones, which have 0–10% by area clasts. We examined three models to explain this distribution: gravitational settling of clasts, thermally driven local assimilation of clasts, and mechanical sorting of clasts due to turbulent flow. Of the three models, the gravitational settling cannot be supported based on our field and geophysical data. The assimilation of clasts and turbulent flow of clasts, however, can both potentially result in inhomogeneous clast distribution. Zones of fully assimilated clasts and nonassimilated clasts can occur from spatial temperature differences of 100 °C. Mechanical sorting driven by a turbulent flow can also generate zones of inhomogeneous clast distribution. Both local assimilation and mechanical sorting due to turbulent flow likely contributed to the observed distribution of clasts.

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