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jasper

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Journal Article
Journal: Economic Geology
Published: 01 September 2019
Economic Geology (2019) 114 (6): 1207–1222.
..., and minor siderite with distinct alternating iron-rich and silica-rich bands. The hematite shows δ 56 Fe and δ 18 O values in the range of –0.31 to 0.80‰ and 2.2 to 7.0‰, respectively, and the jasper yields δ 30 Si values of –1.90 to –1.20 ‰ . Iron and Si were both derived from hydrothermal fluids related...
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Series: GSA Special Papers
Published: 01 October 2015
DOI: 10.1130/2015.2517(02)
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 September 2014
GSA Bulletin (2014) 126 (9-10): 1245–1258.
... photosynthesis. Here we present new petrographic evidence from the Marble Bar Chert (in drill hole ABDP1) that shows that hematite in jasper bands formed via mineral replacement reactions. The hematite mostly occurs as sub-micron–sized inclusions within chert (so-called “dusty” hematite) that are typically...
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Journal Article
Published: 30 January 2012
Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences (2012) 49 (2): 455–476.
... may far exceed the direct significance of the rocks themselves. Above the basal clastic interval, the iron formation consists of variably interbedded BIF and nodular iron formation units. Continuous jasper beds are common in nodular units, particularly in the thicker intervals of this rock type...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 July 2006
Journal of the Geological Society (2006) 163 (4): 723–736.
... to great depth in the bleached regolith followed the water tables down. The climate was warm and dry with a high water deficit. Groundwater silcretes formed near-horizontal lenses and pods of porcellanite and jasper in the bleached regolith. They preserve the primary fabric of the host rock. Groundwater...
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Journal Article
Journal: Economic Geology
Published: 01 December 2005
Economic Geology (2005) 100 (8): 1511–1527.
...Tor Grenne; John F. Slack Abstract Stratiform beds of jasper (hematitic chert), composed essentially of SiO 2 (69–95 wt %) and Fe 2 O 3 (3–25 wt %), can be traced several kilometers along strike in the Ordovician Løkken ophiolite, Norway. These siliceous beds are closely associated...
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Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 April 2003
Geology (2003) 31 (4): 319–322.
...Tor Grenne; John F. Slack Abstract Laterally extensive beds of highly siliceous, hematitic chert (jasper) are associated with many volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits of Late Cambrian to Early Cretaceous age, yet are unknown in analogous younger (including modern) settings. Textural studies...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: Economic Geology
Published: 01 August 2001
Economic Geology (2001) 96 (5): 1227–1237.
... number of stratiform quartz-hematite lenses (red jaspers). Rather than drill test all of these occurrences, a geochemical index was determined to assist in ranking them. Elevated Ba, S, and Pb along with positive chondrite-normalized Europium anomalies were found to be characteristics of proximal jaspers...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 March 1994
The Canadian Mineralogist (1994) 32 (1): 111–120.
Journal Article
Published: 01 July 1989
Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences (1989) 26 (7): 1325–1342.
...V. M. Levson; N. W. Rutter Abstract Geomorphic, stratigraphic, and sedimentologic evidence obtained from Quaternary sediments near Jasper, Alberta, is used to reconstruct depositional environments in the vicinity of two former confluent valley glaciers. Sedimentation occurred mainly in the valley...
Journal Article
Published: 01 September 1978
Bulletin of Canadian Petroleum Geology (1978) 26 (3): 343–361.
.... This distinctive, recessive-weathering unit occurs throughout much of Jasper National Park and was previously referred to as "map-unit 3." The type section is located on the north spur of Chetamon Mountain 13 mi (21 km) north of Jasper, Alberta. The lithology, paleontology, distribution and correlation are briefly...
Journal Article
Published: 01 June 1978
Bulletin of Canadian Petroleum Geology (1978) 26 (2): 218–236.
...David R. Kobluk ABSTRACT Assemblages of stromatoporoid forms in an Upper Devonian reef complex (Miette reef, Jasper, Alberta), produced by grouping individual fossiliferous stratigraphic units on the basis of common populations of forms, may be used to reconstruct the reef on a two-dimensional...
Journal Article
Published: 01 September 1977
Journal of Sedimentary Research (1977) 47 (3): 1261–1286.
... and environmental significance. The chert conglomerate beds, for example, are interpreted as tidal-channel deposits by RLF and as mass-flow deposits by EFM. Jasper beds are bizarre: they are lumpy uneven beds 0.2 to 2 m thick composed of cherry-red chert with local geopetal cavities, contorted laminae...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 March 1972
AAPG Bulletin (1972) 56 (3): 648.
...R. Riding Abstract Nine genera of small calcareous fossils, generally attributed to the algae, are in samples from the Upper Devonian Fairholme Group exposed at the southeastern margin of the Ancient Wall reef complex at Mount Haultain, near Jasper, Alberta. In order of decreasing abundance...
Journal Article
Published: 01 September 1965
Bulletin of Canadian Petroleum Geology (1965) 13 (3): 453.
...J. Steiner This study has concentrated on the development of the basal part of the Lower Miette Formation in the Tekarra Creek map-area, Jasper. The rocks under investigation, assigned to the Windermere Group, were apparently deposited in a deltaic environment and consist of alternating...
Journal Article
Published: 01 September 1965
Bulletin of Canadian Petroleum Geology (1965) 13 (3): 451.
... interpretation is possible. The metamorphic minerals present fall within the quartz-albite-muscovite-chlorite subfacies of the greensehist facies. Copyright © 1965, The Canadian Society of Petroleum Geologists 1965 45l THE GEOLOGY OF THE ~VYND MAP-AREA, JASPER, ALI~ErCTA R. E. GR IFF ITHS 1962, University...
Journal Article
Published: 01 April 1964
American Mineralogist (1964) 49 (3-4): 339–347.
...E. A. Monroe Abstract Chert, flint, and jasper has a predominately granular texture, whereas chalcedony has chiefly a spongy-porous texture. Some samples of chert and chalcedony show both the granular and porous types transitional to one another. The granular texture agrees with petrographie...
Journal Article
Journal: Economic Geology
Published: 01 September 1953
Economic Geology (1953) 48 (6): 501–502.
Journal Article
Journal: Economic Geology
Published: 01 December 1952
Economic Geology (1952) 47 (8): 823–824.
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 February 1944
GSA Bulletin (1944) 55 (2): 211–254.
... of erosion are shown to be due to local structures and are not windows in an overthrust sheet. Occurrences of jasper are described and shown to occupy a definite stratigraphic position in the geologic sequence and are not the product of silicification along the sole of a great thrust. Gravimetric data...