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Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 May 1981
Geology (1981) 9 (5): 200–204.
.... Structures formed during the last stage of transport of the Farmington Canyon Complex over folded but mostly unmetamorphosed Paleozoic strata occur in the upper plate of the Ogden thrust fault, which was emplaced by cataclastic flow. Intraplate strain was accommodated by brittle faulting, and new greenschist...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 May 1980
GSA Bulletin (1980) 91 (5): 307–312.
.... Deformation of the sand veneer provides a classic example of cataclastic flow. Forced folds develop as a result of microfracturing, rigid-body rotation of grains and fragments, and faulting and gouge development. The sand veneer is thinned drastically in the zone of faulting. The multilithologic, layered...
Journal Article
Published: 01 March 1980
Bulletin of Canadian Petroleum Geology (1980) 28 (1): 130–138.
..., is one in which actual movement of the fluids occurs. Geographical pressure differences under these conditions are assumed to reflect fluid flow from regions of high to low potential (which is not the same as pressure). Gradients are thus non-vertical, so that associated hydrocarbons move along potential...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 December 1979
GSA Bulletin (1979) 90 (12_Part_II): 1839–1859.
... that the instantaneous mapping of a significant areal extent of a braided river is a matter of extreme difficult and that this difficulty is compounded by the rapid change of the channel pattern at high flows. To understand the evolution of braided rivers, it is necessary to acquire detailed records covering at least...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 December 1979
GSA Bulletin (1979) 90 (12): 1094–1095.
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 May 1977
AAPG Bulletin (1977) 61 (5): 653–670.
...D. V. Wiltschko; W. M. Chapple ABSTRACT A thin-skinned fold model of Appalachian Plateau folds in which layers do not thin in synclines is not possible geometrically. However, a two-layer model consisting of a gently folded competent layer overlying a deformed zone in which material flows from...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 May 1977
Quarterly Journal of Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology (1977) 10 (2): 97–124.
...David J. Bourdon Summary The great groundwater basins of North Africa and Arabia extend over an area of some 6.5 million square kilometres. Gradients on the isopiezometric surfaces of their confined ground-waters are generally interpreted as indicating present-day flow of groundwater. Can such flow...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 December 1976
GSA Bulletin (1976) 87 (12): 1665–1677.
... (intracrystalline glide) in the zone of strong single-maximum fabrics and movement of ice along discrete shear planes situated well above bed rock are also major contributors to the flow of the ice sheet. Any extensive shearing at depth could seriously distort stratigraphic records contained in the ice cores...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 December 1976
GSA Bulletin (1976) 87 (12): 1684–1692.
... on the scale of the folds and that the banding is essentially passive. Flow considerations indicate that banding or foliation will tend to become parallel to the particle paths near the glacier base and toward the margin under steady-state conditions. However, departures from the steady state in the form...
Journal Article
Published: 01 March 1976
Journal of Sedimentary Research (1976) 46 (1): 188–199.
...D. R. Lowe Abstract The term grain flow is restricted to sediment gravity flows in which a dispersion of cohesionless grains is maintained against gravity by grain dispersive pressure and in which the fluid interstitial to the grains is the same as the ambient fluid above the flow. Modified flows...
Journal Article
Published: 01 March 1976
Journal of Sedimentary Research (1976) 46 (1): 56–69.
... and was developed between the two rises. Sand was transported across the fan by high density turbidity currents. Just before deposition, the flows probably lost turbulence and passed through two stages of mass movement: (1) a stage of grain- and/or fluidized sediment flow, during which a slight inverse grading...
Journal Article
Published: 01 February 1976
Journal of the Geological Society (1976) 132 (1): 17–26.
...J. R. L. ALLEN; P. F. FRIEND Abstract The relaxation time of a bed form is the time required by the feature to equilibrate to a new flow condition after a change of flow. In the case of dunes formed by flows that periodically decelerate into the ripple existence-field, or into the field of no bed...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 February 1976
GSA Bulletin (1976) 87 (2): 199–206.
Journal Article
Published: 01 January 1976
Geological Magazine (1976) 113 (1): 77–82.
Journal Article
Published: 01 January 1976
Environmental and Engineering Geoscience (1976) xiii (3): 177–197.
... potential of reservoirs and for pollution potential studies in karst areas. Conventional methods used for establishing subsurface conditions, such as water wells and piezometers do not always work in karst terrains, and direct tracing of subsurface flow is required. Among the tracers commonly used...
Journal Article
Published: 01 December 1975
Journal of Sedimentary Research (1975) 45 (4): 944–950.
... formed by fining of burrows or root casts by fluid-saturated volcanic ash. The short projections intermediate axes are coincident with the axes of loaded ripples and indicate that these structures probably formed by thixotropic flow through ripple troughs. Volcanic masses within host sand are most...
Journal Article
Published: 01 October 1975
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (1975) 65 (5): 1133–1162.
... E. Merzer A. M. (1974) . Fluctuations in oil flow before and after earthquakes , Nature 247 , 534 - 535 . Barsukov O. M. (1974) . Variations in the electric resistivity of rocks and earthquakes , Earthquake Precursors , Acad. Sci. USSR , 1973, 216 pp...
Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 September 1975
Geology (1975) 3 (9): 521–523.
...Arthur I. Mears Abstract Mountain development in Colorado occasionally is done below slopes subject to snow avalanches. For such development, it is necessary to evaluate quantitatively the hazard, so that buildings may be designed for tolerable impact loads or the flowing snow may be avoided...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 February 1975
AAPG Bulletin (1975) 59 (2): 337–345.
... of the liquid. There is no possibility of dissolving this much oil in water, even with the aid of solubilizers. Much of the shale surface may be wetted by oil, so that the saturation at which oil will flow as a continuous phase may be less than 10 percent. Furthermore, much of the water in the pores...
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Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 February 1975
Geology (1975) 3 (2): 57–62.