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Journal Article
Published: 11 July 2017
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (2017) 107 (4): 1688-1703.
...Emanuel D. Kästle; Michael Weber; Frank Krüger AbstractWe use recently deployed seismological arrays in Africa to sample a 2D cross section through the mantle down to the core–mantle boundary (CMB). By making use of travel‐time residuals of S, ScS, and SKS phases, a new shear‐velocity model...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 February 2016
Mineralogical Magazine (2016) 80 (1): 31-41.
...Henrik Friis AbstractMoskvinite-(Y), Na2K(Y,REE)Si6O15, is a rare mineral, which until now has only been described from its type locality Dara-i-Pioz, Tajikistan. At Ilímaussaq moskvinite-(Y) was discovered in a drill core from Kvanefjeld, where it occurs as a replacement mineral associated...
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Journal Article
Published: 15 December 2015
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (2015) 106 (1): 307-312.
...Taghi Shirzad; Zaher‐Hossein Shomali AbstractAmbient seismic‐noise correlation is a powerful tool for extracting the seismic core phases that propagate through the interior of the Earth. In this study, we present and refine the root‐mean‐square‐stacking method to extract stable core phases (e.g...
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Series: GSA Special Papers
Published: 01 October 2015
DOI: 10.1130/2015.2514(01)
... It is widely assumed that the boundary layer above the core is the source of intraplate volcanoes such as Hawaii, Samoa, and Yellowstone, and that the sub-plate boundary layer at the top of the mantle is thin and entirely subsolidus. In fact, this upper layer is thicker and has higher...
Series: GSA Special Papers
Published: 01 October 2015
DOI: 10.1130/2015.2514(02)
... Near-vertical multiple ScS (S waves reflected at the core-mantle boundary) phases are among the cleanest seismic phases traveling over several thousand kilometers in the Earth's mantle and are useful for constraining the average attenuation and shear wave speed in the whole mantle. However...
Journal Article
Published: 01 December 2014
South African Journal of Geology (2014) 117 (2): 211-218.
... represent core field characteristics and no crustal field effects (Finlay and Gillet, private communication, 2014). I subsequently used my SCHA model and calculated values for D, I and H at 0.5 degree intervals for the area between 25°S and 35°S and between 17°E and 32°E. Contour plots for D, I and H...
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Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 March 2013
GSA Bulletin (2013) 125 (3-4): 445-452.
... transport ( Fig. 3C ). Such a dramatic climate change would be expected to reduce terrestrial primary production and reduce hydrologic influx of materials to the aquatic system. Two overlapping piston cores (STD-DEM06–1B and STD2-DEM07–5A) encompassing the entire lacustrine sedimentary section were...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 April 2011
The Canadian Mineralogist (2011) 49 (2): 555-572.
... iron + cohenite in basalt from Disko Island, Greenland. Such highly reduced conditions might have occurred early in the history of Earth; for example, according to the model of growth of the Earth’s core by Galimov (2005) , such conditions prevailed during only the first 100 million years...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 November 2010
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (2010) 100 (5B): 2858-2865.
...Cheng-Horng Lin AbstractBecause the Earth’s outer core is liquid, shear waves generated by a large earthquake that travel to the core (ScS) are totally reflected with strong seismic energy. It is interesting to note that one large aftershock (Mw 6.0) of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (Mw 7.9...
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Journal Article
Journal: Lithosphere
Published: 01 October 2010
Lithosphere (2010) 2 (5): 361-376.
... Pacific, suggesting that hotspots are the surface expressions of mantle plumes originating from the deepest mantle. It is postulated that the apparent co-pulsations in magmatism result from global fluctuations in core-mantle interaction, involving periodic heating of Earth's core and subsequent increases...
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Journal Article
Journal: Elements
Published: 01 August 2009
Elements (2009) 5 (4): 217-222.
...John A. Tarduno AbstractThe long-term history of the geodynamo provides insight into how Earth's innermost and outermost parts formed. The magnetic field is generated in the liquid-iron core as a result of convection driven by heat carried across the core-mantle boundary and freezing of the solid...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 September 2007
AAPG Bulletin (2007) 91 (9): 1295-1318.
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Journal Article
Published: 01 September 2007
South African Journal of Geology (2007) 110 (2-3): 193-202.
... provided unique opportunities for studying the magnetic field of the Earth’s core and its secular variation over the globe. The southern African continent (extending into the southern Atlantic Ocean) is an important area for such studies because of its intriguing field behaviour at both the Earth’s surface...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 April 2004
Journal of Foraminiferal Research (2004) 34 (2): 96-101.
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Journal Article
Published: 01 April 2004
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (2004) 94 (2): 665-677.
... 29.6° to 167.2°. Examination of travel times suggests these teleseismic P waves constitute the suite of body-wave arrivals from direct mantle P to outer- and inner-core reflected/refracted phases. The amplitudes of the teleseismic P waves also exhibit the typical solid-earth wave field phenomena of a P...
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Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 May 2003
Geology (2003) 31 (5): 415-418.
... to adequately represent the time-averaged field, the mean and range of values are similar to those of the present-day field. These values suggest that the inner core, which may stabilize the geodynamo, had started to grow by Early Proterozoic time. Unfortunately, Thellier data meeting laboratory reliability...
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Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 November 1998
Geology (1998) 26 (11): 1007-1010.
... islands of the St. Andrew Strait. This region of plume or hotspot 3He/4He ratios coincides with a domain of anomalously low seismic velocities at the underlying core-mantle boundary, and indicates that the provenance of high-3He/4He magmas in the Manus Basin (and possibly elsewhere) is linked...
Journal Article
Published: 01 December 1993
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (1993) 83 (6): 1835-1854.
...S. Houard; J. L. Plantet; J. P. Massot; H. C. Nataf AbstractThe purpose of this paper is 2-fold. It is first a continuation of the study of Massot and Rocard (1982) on the amplitude variations of the core waves near the PKP caustic, for French nuclear explosions in the South Pacific recorded...
Journal Article
Published: 01 October 1991
Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences (1991) 28 (10): 1583-1593.
...) comparable to that on the large debris flow, suggesting equivalent age.Pollen and plant macrofossils are described from a core taken in Seeley Lake. This core spans the period from ca. 9200 BP to the present. A disturbance event in 3380 ± 110 BP, correlative with the large Chicago Creek debris flow...
Journal Article
Published: 01 July 1990
Journal of Foraminiferal Research (1990) 20 (3): 212-245.