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spent fuel

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Journal Article
Published: 01 November 2015
Mineralogical Magazine (2015) 79 (6): 1505-1513.
... are designed to ensure that criticality is not possible during the transport and operational phases of a GDF and for a significant period post-closure. However, over longer post-closure timescales, conditions in the GDF will evolve. For waste packages containing spent fuel, it can be shown that, under certain...
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Journal Article
Journal: Clay Minerals
Published: 01 January 2015
Clay Minerals (2015) 51 (2): 249-266.
... Handbook, Vol. 13B, Corrosion: Materials ( S.D. Cramer and B.S. Covino Jr., editors). ASM International (Materials Park, Ohio, USA) . SKB/POSIVA ( 2008 ) Horizontal deposition of canisters for spent nuclear fuel – Summary of the KBS-3H Project 2004–2007 . SKB Technical Report TR-08-03. POSIVA 2008...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 December 2012
Mineralogical Magazine (2012) 76 (8): 3475-3482.
.... That is, a single geological disposal facility (GDF) could be constructed that consists of a module for low- and intermediate-level waste, and a module for high-level waste and spent fuel. A safety case for a co-located GDF will have to consider the extent to which evolving thermo-hydromechanical-chemical and gas...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 December 1981
Clays and Clay Minerals (1981) 29 (6): 299-308.
Series: Geological Society, London, Special Publications
Published: 01 January 2004
DOI: 10.1144/GSL.SP.2004.236.01.05
EISBN: 9781862394841
... Abstract Spent fuel from commercial nuclear reactors consists mainly of uranium oxide. However, the changes that occur during reactor operations have a profound effect on chemical and physical properties of this material. Heat build-up in the fuel pellet during reactor operations can cause...
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Photograph of <b>spent</b> <b>fuel</b> test at the Climax stock showing central drift and...
Published: 01 February 2016
Figure 5.  Photograph of spent fuel test at the Climax stock showing central drift and vertical emplacement chambers.
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The KBS-3 method. The method involves encapsulating the <b>spent</b> <b>fuel</b> in coppe...
Published: 01 December 2013
Figure 1 The KBS-3 method. The method involves encapsulating the spent fuel in copper canisters which are then emplaced, surrounded by a buffer of bentonite clay, in deposition holes in a tunnel system at a depth of 400–700 m in the bedrock ( SKB, 2011 , reproduced with permission). BWR: boiling
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Schematic illustration of the microstructure of <b>spent</b> <b>fuel</b> and the distribu...
in > Elements
Published: 01 December 2006
FIGURE 2 Schematic illustration of the microstructure of spent fuel and the distribution of actinides and fission products following burn-up in a reactor. Red labels indicate nearly instantaneous release upon contact with water; blue indicates slower release rates. An = actinides and Ln
Journal Article
Published: 01 November 1981
Environmental and Engineering Geoscience (1981) xviii (4): 355-367.
...DALE G. WILDER; WESLEY C. PATRICK Abstract Currently, storage and retrieval of spent nuclear reactor fuel assemblies in granite are being tested 420 m (1,400 ft) underground at the U.S. Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site. Eleven Westinghouse PWR spent fuel assemblies from Turkey Point Unit...
Series: European Mineralogical Union Notes in Mineralogy
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.1180/EMU-notes.13.9
EISBN: 9780903056403
... than a conventional surface store. In normal operation, present practice in the nuclear power industry comes fairly close to achieving containment. There are authorized gaseous and liquid discharges associated with power plant operation and also with spent-fuel reprocessing; authorization implies...
Series: Geological Society, London, Special Publications
Published: 01 January 2017
DOI: 10.1144/SP443.19
EISBN: 9781786203267
... of nuclear spent fuel in Finland. The bentonite barriers were simulated with the Barcelona Basic Model and the model was calibrated from laboratory tests. The evolution of gap closure and the presence of a fracture intersecting the disposal were analysed. The simulations were performed in 2D axisymmetrical...
Series: GSA Reviews in Engineering Geology
Published: 01 January 2008
DOI: 10.1130/2008.4119(08)
EISBN: 9780813758190
... is currently in use. An expansion of the SFR is planned to accommodate radioactive waste from the decommissioning of the nation's power plants. Construction of the interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel, Clab, started in 1980, and the facility was put into operation in 1985. The facility is located...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 December 2012
Mineralogical Magazine (2012) 76 (8): 3003-3017.
...F. G. F. Gibb; K. P. Travis; K. W. Hesketh Abstract The heat outputs of higher burn up spent fuels (SF) create problems for disposal in mined repositories, including needs for reduced container loadings and extended pre-disposal cooling. An alternative that is less temperature sensitive is deep...
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Series: European Mineralogical Union Notes in Mineralogy
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.1180/EMU-notes.2.9
EISBN: 9780903056427
... plant operation and also with spent fuel reprocessing. Much the greater part of the activity ends up as solid wastes and these are what we are primarily concerned with here. Current technology allows all these waste forms to be packaged safely and stored with effective shielding. There is an additional...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 November 2015
Mineralogical Magazine (2015) 79 (6): 1591-1597.
...) with a view to advancing the implementation of geological disposal facilities for spent fuel, high-level and other long-lived waste in Europe. The IGD-TP's Vision is that “by 2025, the first geological disposal facilities for spent fuel, high-level waste and other long-lived radioactive waste...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: Elements
Published: 01 December 2006
Elements (2006) 2 (6): 343-349.
...FIGURE 2 Schematic illustration of the microstructure of spent fuel and the distribution of actinides and fission products following burn-up in a reactor. Red labels indicate nearly instantaneous release upon contact with water; blue indicates slower release rates. An = actinides and Ln...
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Journal Article
Journal: Elements
Published: 01 August 2016
Elements (2016) 12 (4): 247-252.
...Allan Hedin; Olle Olsson Abstract The granitic bedrock at Forsmark (Sweden) provides a well suited host rock for a geological repository in which to safely dispose of spent nuclear fuel. The properties of the host rock have been thoroughly investigated through boreholes from the surface...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 November 2015
Mineralogical Magazine (2015) 79 (6): 1581-1589.
...Povilas Poskas; Asta Narkuniene; Dalia Grigaliuniene Abstract In Lithuania all the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) came from operation of the Ignalina nuclear power plant with two reactors of RBMK type (RBMK is a Russian acronym for ‘Channelized Large Power Reactor’ which is a water-cooled graphite...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 August 2003
Mineralogical Magazine (2003) 67 (4): 689-696.
...P. W. O. Hoskin; P. C. Burns Abstract Compreignacite, a naturally occurring potassium uranyl oxide hydrate, is an expected alteration product of spent nuclear fuel subjected to oxidative corrosion in the presence of water. Ion-exchange experiments were performed using natural crystals...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 January 1999
Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry (1999) 38 (1): 475-497.