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ocean acidification

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Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 January 2015
Geology (2015) 43 (1): 7-10.
...Thomas M. DeCarlo; Anne L. Cohen; Hannah C. Barkley; Quinn Cobban; Charles Young; Kathryn E. Shamberger; Russell E. Brainard; Yimnang Golbuu Abstract Coral reefs exist in a delicate balance between calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) production and CaCO 3 loss. Ocean acidification (OA), the CO 2 -driven...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 July 2017
Journal of Foraminiferal Research (2017) 47 (3): 294-303.
... and a subsequent decrease in ocean pH and saturation state with respect to calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ; Doney et al., 2009 ; Feely et al., 2009 ). This pH decline in Earth's seawater has been termed “ocean acidification” (OA) and progressing CO 2 emissions are predicted to result in aragonite undersaturation...
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Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 April 2016
Geology (2016) 44 (4): 275-278.
... the extent of ocean warming and acidification associated with the carbon injection we generated elemental and isotopic records of surface and thermocline planktonic foraminifera across the Paleocene-Eocene boundary from an expanded section along the Mid-Atlantic coastal plain, New Jersey (USA). Ocean...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 January 2016
Journal of Foraminiferal Research (2016) 46 (1): 25-33.
... as ocean acidification (OA). Simultaneously, rising global temperatures, also linked to higher atmospheric CO 2 concentrations, result in a more stratified surface ocean, reducing exchange between surface and deeper waters, leading to expansion of oxygen-limited zones (hypoxia). Numerous studies have...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 April 2015
Journal of Foraminiferal Research (2015) 45 (2): 109-127.
...Paul O. Knorr; Lisa L. Robbins; Peter J. Harries; Pamela Hallock; Jonathan Wynn Abstract A common, but not universal, effect of ocean acidification on benthic foraminifera is a reduction in the growth rate. The miliolid Archaias angulatus is a high-Mg (>4 mole% MgCO 3 ), symbiont-bearing...
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Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 December 2014
Geology (2014) 42 (12): 1103-1106.
...Frank Ohnemueller; Anthony R. Prave; Anthony E. Fallick; Simone A. Kasemann Abstract Boron isotope patterns preserved in cap carbonates deposited in the aftermath of the younger Cryogenian (Marinoan, ca. 635 Ma) glaciation confirm a temporary ocean acidification event on the continental margin...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 October 2014
Journal of Foraminiferal Research (2014) 44 (4): 341-351.
.... These results differ from some previous observations that ocean acidification can cause a variety of effects on benthic foraminifera, including test dissolution, decreased growth, and mottling (loss of symbiont color in symbiont-bearing species), suggesting that the benthic foraminiferal response to ocean...
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Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 September 2013
Geology (2013) 41 (9): 1039-1040.
... to past climates in Earth history, skills required for geologic CO 2 sequestration, and the rapid emergence of ocean acidification as an environmental threat are all prime subject matter for the literate geoscientist today. In this issue of Geology , Carey et al. (2013 , p. 1035) describe a new...
Journal Article
Journal: PALAIOS
Published: 01 May 2013
PALAIOS (2013) 28 (5): 317-332.
... record does not accurately reflect the presence and abundance of ophiuroids, thus complicating their use in paleoenvironmental, paleoclimatic, and paleoecologic reconstructions. These results also provide baseline information about CaCO 3 skeletal dissolution needed to monitor the ocean acidification...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 April 2013
Geochemical Perspectives (2013) 2 (1): 124-149.
...Fred T. Mackenzie; Andreas J. Andersson The initial publication of the SOCM results provides an amusing story of how modern ocean acidification science evolved. As we felt our initial modelling results were quite important, we first submitted the manuscript to Nature, but the manuscript came...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 April 2013
Geochemical Perspectives (2013) 2 (1): 1-3.
...Fred T. Mackenzie; Andreas J. Andersson Abstract The global CO 2 -carbonic acid-carbonate system of seawater, although certainly a well-researched topic of interest in the past, has risen to the fore in recent years because of the environmental issue of ocean acidification (often simply termed OA...
Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 August 2012
Geology (2012) 40 (8): 743-746.
..., but are consistent with a negative shift in the δ 44/40 Ca of seawater. Such a shift is best accounted for by an episode of ocean acidification, pointing toward strong similarities between the greatest catastrophe in the history of animal life and anticipated global change during the twenty-first century. * E...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 April 2012
Geochemical Perspectives (2012) 1 (2): 302-304.
... coral lagoon ( Fig. 25a ) to assess the impact of acidification that would occur as fossil fuel CO 2 built up in the surface ocean, shifting the distribution of carbonate species and driving down its CO 3 2− concentration. Our plan was to manipulate the coral lagoon’s carbonate ion concentration...
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Journal Article
Journal: Elements
Published: 01 October 2010
Elements (2010) 6 (5): 299-303.
.... Equilibration of increasing amounts of CO 2 with surface waters will decrease the pH of the oceans (called ocean acidification ) from a current value of 8.1 to values as low as 7.4 over the next 200 years. Decreasing the pH affects the production of solid CaCO 3 by microorganisms in surface waters and its...
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Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 September 2010
Geology (2010) 38 (9): 775-778.
... in marine carbonates. Our data suggest a largely constant ocean pH and no critically elevated p CO 2 throughout the older postglacial and interglacial periods. In contrast, a marked ocean acidification event marks the younger deglaciation period and is compatible with elevated postglacial p CO 2...
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Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 December 2009
Geology (2009) 37 (12): 1131-1134.
... that future CO 2 -induced reductions in the CaCO 3 saturation state of seawater will have on marine organisms that construct their shells and skeletons from this mineral. Here, we present the results of 60 d laboratory experiments in which we investigated the effects of CO 2 -induced ocean acidification...
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Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 January 2016
Geology (2016) 44 (1): 59-62.
...Samantha J. Gibbs; Paul R. Bown; Andy Ridgwell; Jeremy R. Young; Alex J. Poulton; Sarah A. O’Dea Abstract Current carbon dioxide emissions are an assumed threat to oceanic calcifying plankton (coccolithophores) not just due to rising sea-surface temperatures, but also because of ocean acidification...
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Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 25 January 2018
GSA Bulletin (2018) 130 (7-8): 1323-1338.
... composition of marine carbonate rocks spanning the end-Permian extinction horizon in South China has been used to argue for an ocean acidification event coincident with mass extinction. This interpretation has proven controversial, both because the excursion has not been demonstrated across multiple, widely...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 April 2014
Journal of Foraminiferal Research (2014) 44 (2): 76-89.
...Kristin Haynert; Joachim Schönfeld Abstract The present study investigated the combined effects of ocean acidification, temperature, and salinity on growth and test degradation of Ammonia aomoriensis . This species is one of the dominant benthic foraminifera in near-coastal habitats...
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Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 November 2011
Geology (2011) 39 (11): 1059-1062.
...-Permian extinction was considerably more severe than the Guadalupian or other Phanerozoic physiological crises. Its magnitude may have resulted from a larger environmental perturbation, although the combination of warming, hypercapnia, ocean acidification, and hypoxia during the end-Permian extinction...
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