1-20 OF 124 RESULTS FOR

isoelectric points

Results shown limited to content with bounding coordinates.
Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Published: 01 October 2016
American Mineralogist (2016) 101 (10): 2248–2259.
...Yingge Wang; Per Persson; F. Marc Michel; Gordon E. Brown, Jr. Abstract The surface charging behavior as a function of pH and isoelectric points (IEPs) of single-crystal α-Al 2 O 3 (0001) and ( 1 1 ¯ 02 ) and α-Fe 2 O 3 (0001) was determined by streaming potential measurements using...
FIGURES | View All (5)
Journal Article
Published: 01 February 1986
Clays and Clay Minerals (1986) 34 (1): 108–110.
Journal Article
Published: 01 April 2011
Clays and Clay Minerals (2011) 59 (2): 107–115.
...) (PZC = 5.9±0.1), powder addition (PA) (PZC = 5.98±0.08), and isoelectric point, IEP (PZC = 4.4±0.1). The IEP measurement was in agreement with literature values. However, MT and PA resulted in a statistically larger PZC than the IEP measurement. The surface area of pyrolusite, 2.2 m 2 g −1 , was too...
FIGURES | View All (6)
Journal Article
Published: 01 July 2004
American Mineralogist (2004) 89 (7): 1048–1055.
... characteristics and corresponding isoelectric points (pI) of amino acids, we immersed quartz and calcite in solutions of six amino acids. Quartz (pH pzc ≈ 2.8) tends to adsorb amino acids most strongly when pH pzc and pI differ significantly. Thus quartz adsorbs lysine (pI = 9.74) more strongly than amino acids...
FIGURES | View All (4)
Series: Geological Society, London, Engineering Geology Special Publications, Geological Society, London, Engineering Geology Special Publications
Published: 01 January 2016
DOI: 10.1144/EGSP27.20
EISBN: 9781862399723
.... At pH values above the isoelectric point of the edges (IEP edge ) of the clay particles, the hydraulic conductivities of the clay samples tended to increase with increasing concentration of salt of the permeating water. The changes in the index and hydraulic parameters of the clay samples were...
FIGURES | View All (8)
Journal Article
Published: 01 April 2013
Clays and Clay Minerals (2013) 61 (2): 152–164.
... at the chlorite basal-plane surfaces and edge surface were obtained by fitting force curves with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theoretical model. The results show that at pH 5.6, 8.0, and 9.0 the chlorite mica-like face is negatively charged with the isoelectric point (IEP) less than pH 5.6. In contrast...
FIGURES | View All (9)
Journal Article
Published: 01 October 2010
Clays and Clay Minerals (2010) 58 (5): 589–595.
... material. Both starting materials were first characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and by isoelectric-point using vibrating-sample magnetometry. The synthetic Fe oxide-containing material was characterized as a mixture of magnetite (Fe 3 O 4...
FIGURES | View All (5)
Journal Article
Published: 01 April 2009
Clays and Clay Minerals (2009) 57 (2): 161–167.
...Motoharu Kawano; Tamao Hatta; Jinyeon Hwang Abstract Amino acids are present in various geochemical environments and they interact with mineral surfaces. To evaluate the effects of amino acids on mineral dissolution at pH conditions less than their isoelectric points (pI), dissolution experiments...
FIGURES | View All (4)
Journal Article
Published: 01 April 2004
Clays and Clay Minerals (2004) 52 (2): 145–157.
... of a suspension with a precision and accuracy in the mV range. Despite the clear potential for their use in environmental settings, to date, acoustic methods have been used mainly on clay mineral colloids with industrial application, typically combined with similar measurements such as isoelectric point (IEP...
FIGURES | View All (4)
Journal Article
Published: 01 June 2002
Clays and Clay Minerals (2002) 50 (3): 342–347.
... by a shift of the isoelectric point and the maximum of the initial yield stress to more acidic pH (Si ionic species adsorption) and more basic pH (Mg ionic species adsorption), when compared to suspensions containing only non-adsorbing electrolytes. The initial yield-stress values determined in samples...
FIGURES | View All (6)
Journal Article
Published: 01 February 2002
Clays and Clay Minerals (2002) 50 (1): 18–24.
.... At the isoelectric point, the DTAC concentration was 0.012 mol/dm 3 and the FMS tactoid formed a regular stacked structure with a 2.25 nm layer thickness. As the ζ potential of FMS changed from negative to positive, the DC test and XRD measurement showed that the FMS association gradually changed from coagulation...
FIGURES | View All (9)
Journal Article
Published: 01 December 1999
Clays and Clay Minerals (1999) 47 (6): 793–802.
..., and the concentration of the amino acid zwitterion. Near the isoelectric point, fully intercalated phases were obtained in solutions of concentration >0.5-1 M for glycine (Gly), 2-3 M for beta -alanine (beta -Ala), and 12 M for both gamma -aminobutyric acid (gamma -Aba) and delta -aminovaleric acid (delta -Ava...
Journal Article
Journal: Clay Minerals
Published: 01 April 2014
Clay Minerals (2014) 49 (2): 147–164.
.... Stable dispersions are formed, particularly where the solution pH exceeds the isoelectric pH of the mineral, which is often at alkali pH values, so that both basal face and edge surfaces are negatively charged and the particles repel each other. The osmotic swelling of smectitic clays to a gel-like form...
FIGURES | View All (11)
Image
Dissolution rates of amorphous silica in system E containing 10.0 mmol/L of...
Published: 01 April 2009
Figure 3. Dissolution rates of amorphous silica in system E containing 10.0 mmol/L of amino acids in solution at pH 4 and 25°C plotted as a function of the isoelectric point of each amino acid.
Image
Dissolution rates of amorphous silica in the systems D containing 10.0 mM a...
Published: 01 August 2007
Figure 5. Dissolution rates of amorphous silica in the systems D containing 10.0 mM amino acids in solution pH5.98–6.45 at 25°C plotted as a function of the isoelectric point of each amino acid.
Journal Article
Published: 01 October 2003
Clays and Clay Minerals (2003) 51 (5): 481–492.
.... , Russell , J.D. and Farmer , V.C. ( 1977 ) Adsorption of hydrous oxides. II. Oxalate, benzoate, and phosphate on gibbsite . Journal of Soil Science , 28 , 40 – 47 . Parks , G.A. ( 1965 ) The isoelectric points of solid oxides, solid hydroxides and aqueous hydroxy complex system...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Published: 01 December 2004
The Canadian Mineralogist (2004) 42 (6): 1629–1649.
... is also called the isoelectric point. Stumm (1992) defined pH pzc as the point where the total net surface-charge is zero (this is the condition where particles do not move in an applied electric field). The total net surface-charge is the sum of (1) the permanent structural charge caused...
FIGURES | View All (9)
Image
Example of the measurement of the streaming potential for various values of...
in > Geophysics
Published: 14 December 2012
is positive and hence the zeta potential is positive. This indicates that the isoelectric point is between pH 3.6 and 3.0.
Image
Streaming potential coupling coefficient. (a, b) Value of the streaming pot...
in > Geophysics
Published: 14 December 2012
  + b ) . Sample S22 is influenced by the presence of the smectite, which is generating high surface conductivity and therefore a smaller value of the magnitude of the streaming potential coupling coefficient at low salinities. The term “iep” stands for the isoelectric point. (c, d) Value
Image
(a) Sorption isotherms of μmoles of Hcc sorbed/g of hematite  vs.  μmoles o...
Published: 01 December 2005
overall repulsive (positive) or attractive (negative) forces between hematite and Hcc (references for Hcc isoelectric point and hematite point of zero charge are given in the text; Hamaker constant for van derWaals calculation from Schudel et al. (1997) and Neal et al. (1999) ). The thick dashed