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copropel

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Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 December 1966
GSA Bulletin (1966) 77 (12): 1333–1337.
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 April 1956
AAPG Bulletin (1956) 40 (4): 600–653.
... eutrophic (organically productive) carbonate-hardness lakes in which the bottom deposits are mainly organic brown and gray coprogenic ooze, copropel, or “gyttja.” These lake basins are located in glacial drift. The fifth lake, Burntside, located in Precambrian bedrock, is a soft-water oligotrophic lake (low...
FIGURES | View All (29)
Image
—Differential thermograms of marly <b>copropel</b> and <b>copropelic</b> marl from Prior ...
Published: 01 April 1956
Fig. 18. —Differential thermograms of marly copropel and copropelic marl from Prior and Johanna lakes. Location of stations given in Figures 3 and 4 . 1. Dehydration zone. 2. Broad zone of oxidation of organic matter. 3. Quartz endothermic reaction. 4. Possible illite endothermic reaction. 5
Image
—Differential thermograms of <b>copropel</b> samples from Lake Minnetonka. Locatio...
Published: 01 April 1956
Fig. 17. —Differential thermograms of copropel samples from Lake Minnetonka. Location of stations given in Figure 2 . 1. Dehydration zone. 2. Broad zone of oxidation of organic matter. 3. Quartz endothermic reaction. 4. Possible illite endothermic reaction. 5. Dolomite. 6. Calcite endothermic
Image
—Effects of compaction on alternating layers of <b>copropel</b> and marl. Despite ...
Published: 01 April 1956
Fig. 21. —Effects of compaction on alternating layers of copropel and marl. Despite original high moisture content, copropel compacts to impervious thin parting, whereas marl with less original moisture suffers less volume reduction because it retains more of its porosity. See sections in Lake
Image
—Differential thermograms of diatomaceous <b>copropelic</b> marl from Cedar Lake a...
Published: 01 April 1956
Fig. 19. —Differential thermograms of diatomaceous copropelic marl from Cedar Lake and silty clay from Burntside Lake. Location of stations given in Figures 5 and 6 . 1. Dehydration zone. 2. Broad zone of oxidation of organic matter. 3. Quartz endothermal reaction. 4. Montmorillonite
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 April 1973
GSA Bulletin (1973) 84 (4): 1121–1124.
...W. H. BRADLEY Abstract The oil shale beds of the Wilkins Peak Member of the Green River Formation differ from most of the Green River oil shale of Colorado and Utah because very few of them have varves; they have numerous mud cracks and, locally, desiccation breccias. Many have a copropelic...
Journal Article
Published: 01 September 1958
Journal of Sedimentary Research (1958) 28 (3): 286–297.
...Frederick Morrill Swain; Robert Wooten Meader Abstract The bottom sediments of the southern part of Pyramid Lake consist of fine ashy sands near the mouth of Truckee River and of diatomaceous, ostracodal, ashy, copropelic, and sapropelic silt away from the river month. The wet sediments...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 December 1954
GSA Bulletin (1954) 65 (12): 1183–1198.
...F. M SWAIN; N PROKOPOVICH Abstract The lake and bog deposits of Cedar Creek Forest, Isanti and Anoka counties, Minnesota, consist of a multiple-facies accumulation of marl, peat, copropel, and sapropel. Chromatographic analyses of the lipoid extracts of samples of the sediments show measurable...
Journal Article
Published: 01 March 1969
Bulletin of Canadian Petroleum Geology (1969) 17 (1): 47–66.
... debris in sediments, and remains of bacteria, algae and other 54 F . L. STAPLIN organisms contribute to its bulk . The relative anaerobicity of the environ- ment must be emphasized ; some recent sapropelic-copropelic material has oxygen or shows the presence of some oxygen-users. Anaerobic organisms...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 January 1965
AAPG Bulletin (1965) 49 (1): 41–61.
FIGURES | View All (16)