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blown ice-floe origin

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Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 November 1955
GSA Bulletin (1955) 66 (11): 1329–1350.
... conclusion as to cause other than wind-blown ice floes dragging protruding stones. Ice ramparts and other evidence indicate longshore shearing motion, feasible for ice floes but impossible for ice shove by thermal expansion. The writer finds no evidence that stones, freely wind blown, have made tracks...
Journal Article
Published: 01 June 1977
Bulletin of Canadian Petroleum Geology (1977) 25 (3): 456–467.
.... A slab shape would be necessary, to prevent overturning. A slab of 200 ft (60 m) thickness and 600 ft (180 m) diameter might have floated the Beddington Erratic. LAST WISCONSIN ICE ADVANCE 459 Ice rafts of this size cannot occur by calving from mountain glaciers. Present-day floes of this type originate...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 July 1954
AAPG Bulletin (1954) 38 (7): 1552–1586.
..., as suggested by Buffington, Carsola, and Dietz ( 1950 , pp. 11–14) and others before them. These authors describe a sample taken from an ice-floe at 71° 49ʹ N., 162° 23ʹ W., about 100 miles west of Point Barrow. The gently undulating surface of the ice-floe from which the sample was taken was impregnated...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 October 1991
Earth Sciences History (1991) 10 (2): 168–212.
... be evenly distributed over the ice. The observations did not reveal such a distribution. The observed pattern could be explained more easily by considering the dust to be of local origin, blown inland on the ice from the glacial deposits along the coast. The neglible amounts of dust on the ice at the east...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 October 1991
Earth Sciences History (1991) 10 (2): 259–273.
... in the North Atlantic. This was the famous Fram Expedition of 1893–1895. Nansen’s principal innovation had been to build his ship with an evenly rounded bottom, not with the conventional keel. His reasoning, which was proved to be correct, had been that in dense pack ice where huge ice floes were moving...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 January 2008
Journal of Sedimentary Research (2008) 78 (1): 16–28.
... for this conundrum is the occurrence of an ice-jam flood that created enough backwater in February–March 1995 ( Fig. 4A ) to cause the water surface to locally exceed bankfull at PR125 (and also at PR120). This backwater deposited ice floes and associated sediment on the floodplain (stacks of ice floes...
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Journal Article
Published: 02 December 2014
Proceedings of the Yorkshire Geological Society (2014) 60 (2): 99–121.
... artefacts. This sequence was interpreted as being of fluvial and lacustrine origin and has been ascribed, in part, to deposition under a temperate interstadial or interglacial climate. Structural disturbance of these deposits was attributed to glaciotectonics, the sorted succession being regarded as a floe...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 April 2014
Earth Sciences History (2014) 33 (1): 67–121.
... and looking for those most likely to be of economic value. The search for whales was disappointing, to say the least, and floe ice hindered progress considerably. On 27 December Chief Engineer Johannesen endured a broken and badly-crushed leg, but quick work by Second Officer Jensen, in the end, proved...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 June 1982
AAPG Bulletin (1982) 66 (6): 750–774.
... a paper in which he described the motion of ice floes blown over the surface of the sea by winds. Nansen noticed that the ice did not move directly with the wind, but at an angle 20 to 40° to the right of the wind direction. He concluded that this was due to the Coriolis effect. Subsequently, his...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 October 1998
Earth Sciences History (1998) 17 (2): 111–138.
... buoyantly on the interior (an idea now universally accepted among earth scientists), the continents being lighter than the sub-crust by about the ratio of ice to water, with the analogy to ice floes quite explicit. When Wegener came to write his first papers on the origin of continents and oceans...
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Series: Geological Society, London, Memoirs
Published: 01 January 2016
EISBN: 9781862397088
...: (a) Any ice that has broken apart and drifted from its place of origin by winds and currents, such as a fragment of a sea-ice floe or a detached iceberg; loose, unattached pieces of floating ice with open water predominating over ice and navigable with ease. (a) A synonym of pack ice as that term is used...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 November 1927
AAPG Bulletin (1927) 11 (11): 1173–1220.
... of contiguous segments when a broad ice floe meets with obstructions in the form of islands or shore irregularities. These movements were accompanied by long horizontal faulting which divided the main mass into long east-west segments and by minor folding east of the resisting mass and finally by extensive off...
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... Geological origin example Turbidites (GLACIOLACUSTRINE DEPOSITS Turbidites) Palimpsests Palimpsest lags Clast/boulder pavements (GLACIOLACUSTRINE DEPOSITS Palimpsest lags) Ice-rafted debris Dropstone mud and plumites/silt and mud drapes (ice-rafted debris); dropstone diamicton...
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Series: Geological Society, London, Engineering Geology Special Publications
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.1144/GSL.ENG.2006.021.01.03
EISBN: 9781862393837
... and mineral (and biogenic) materials are eroded, mixed and deposited as sediments by water, wind and ice. Diagenesis involves all those physical and chemical processes that occur between sedimentation and metamorphism, whilst hydrothermal alteration encompasses the interactions between heated water and rock...
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Series: GSA Reviews in Engineering Geology
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.1130/REG15-p257
EISBN: 9780813758152
... transported and emplaced by the same westward-moving ice sheet ( Gripp, 1947 ). Glacial materials again separate the highly disturbed masses or floes (Schollen) of Lower Maastrichtian chalk (Weisse Schreibkreide) ( Steinich, 1972 ; Surlyk, 1984 ; Herrig, 1995 ). A general view is shown in Figure 33...
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Series: Geological Society, London, Engineering Geology Special Publications
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.1144/GSL.ENG.2006.021.01.04
EISBN: 9781862393837
... B of the report provides a compilation of the values of properties for a selection of UK clay deposits. These values are discussed with reference to composition and geological origins. It should be appreciated that the data, which are for guidance only, should not be used as a substitute...
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Series: Society of Exploration Geophysicists Geophysical References Series
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.1190/1.9781560802969.ch1
EISBN: 9781560802969
... of ice floes. 2. The effect of repetitive shots at random times following a shot, produced by ice fracturing when shooting in permafrost. icon : (ī' kon) A symbol on a computer display screen for a program that can be activated by clicking on the icon. ID: I nside D iameter. ideal body...
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