1-20 OF 120 RESULTS FOR

bioactivity

Results shown limited to content with bounding coordinates.
Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Composition diagram for the <b>bioactivity</b> of melt-derived silicate glass. Reg...
in > Elements
Published: 01 December 2007
FIGURE 2 Composition diagram for the bioactivity of melt-derived silicate glass. Region S is a region where bioactive glasses not only bond to bone but also are osteoinductive and gene activating.
Journal Article
Journal: Elements
Published: 01 December 2007
Elements (2007) 3 (6): 393-399.
...FIGURE 2 Composition diagram for the bioactivity of melt-derived silicate glass. Region S is a region where bioactive glasses not only bond to bone but also are osteoinductive and gene activating. ...
FIGURES | View All (4)
Image
Toluene plume with <b>bioactive</b> fringes visualized with a redox indicator and ...
Published: 01 September 2019
Figure 15. Toluene plume with bioactive fringes visualized with a redox indicator and results showing enhanced biomass growth and steep oxygen gradients at the plume fringes (modified after Bauer 2007 and Bauer et al. 2008 ).
Image
Diagram illustrating how a porous <b>bioactive</b> glass scaffold could be used to...
in > Elements
Published: 01 December 2007
FIGURE 1 Diagram illustrating how a porous bioactive glass scaffold could be used to regenerate a bone defect. The scaffold is placed at the site of the injury or defect, where it releases ions that stimulate cells of the native tissue to differentiate, migrate and remodel the scaffold
Image
X-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT) image of a typical <b>bioactive</b> glass sca...
in > Elements
Published: 01 December 2007
FIGURE 3 X-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT) image of a typical bioactive glass scaffold produced by the sol-gel foaming process, with streak lines showing calculated paths of fluid flow. I mage courtesy of G owsihan P oologasundarampillai
Image
<b>Bioactive</b> regions in the CaO-SiO 2 -Na 2 O system. All glasses have a 6% wt...
Published: 01 January 2006
Figure 2. Bioactive regions in the CaO-SiO 2 -Na 2 O system. All glasses have a 6% wt of P 2 O 5 . I b is the index of bioactivity (see text for explanation).
Journal Article
Published: 01 March 2018
American Mineralogist (2018) 103 (3): 350-354.
...) and surface roughness, are developed and used as a functional coating on bioactive glass-based scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. The degradability and the mesostructure stability of these novel MCM-41 particles were evaluated. The particles are immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for up to 28 days...
FIGURES | View All (6)
Series: Geological Society, London, Special Publications
Published: 01 January 2017
DOI: 10.1144/SP452.6
EISBN: 9781786203335
... of ( a ) LE2 (GREY), the bioactive sphragis and ( c ) LE5-3.3 sedimentary clay. Comparison of the two spectra shows that the clay displays far fewer peaks than the sphragis . Negative ionization spectrum of ( b ) LE2 (GREY) bioactive sphragis and ( d ) LE5-3.3 sedimentary clay. Comparison of the two...
FIGURES | View All (8)
Journal Article
Published: 01 October 2014
Mineralogical Magazine (2014) 78 (5): 1115-1140.
...A. Martucci; I. Braschi; L. Marchese; S. Quartieri Abstract Several strategies are available to reduce or eliminate recalcitrant sulfonamide antibiotics (sulfa drugs) from aqueous media. These contaminants are bioactive and ubiquitous pollutants of soils and watercourses and are known to induce...
FIGURES | View All (5)
Journal Article
Journal: Clay Minerals
Published: 01 September 2009
Clay Minerals (2009) 44 (3): 411-416.
... reagent, wax (or paraffin) as the solvent, and oleic acid as the surface active agent, were selected along with bioactive materials such as β-TCP ceramic powder as the main component. The selected components were mixed into a slurry at 30–120°C and shaped into a green body with a hot die-casting machine...
FIGURES | View All (6)
Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 June 2001
Geology (2001) 29 (6): 487-490.
..., macronutrients and “bioactive” trace metals are released fast enough to become available to support primary production. Ash from the 2000 Hekla eruption was sampled 5 h after the onset of the eruption on February 26. The samples were collected in polyethylene bags that were washed with an ash and snow...
FIGURES
Image
Equilateral triangles of surface oxygen sites, on (001) faces associated wi...
Published: 01 January 2006
Figure 8. Equilateral triangles of surface oxygen sites, on (001) faces associated with the silanol groups on silicate three-rings in (a) psW (monoclinic CaSiO 3 ) and (b) with three PO 4 3− tetrahedra in HAP. Also shown is calcium phosphate nucleation on bioactive amorphous glasses or gels
Journal Article
Published: 01 January 2006
Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry (2006) 64 (1): 283-313.
...Figure 2. Bioactive regions in the CaO-SiO 2 -Na 2 O system. All glasses have a 6% wt of P 2 O 5 . I b is the index of bioactivity (see text for explanation). ...
FIGURES | View All (10)
Image
Hypothetical model explaining the origin of the cyclothems of subfacies  Mb...
Published: 01 December 2012
for development of carbonate skeletal fauna, a thin siliciclastic-rich horizon accumulated. B) Conditions of sediment starvation favored the return of bioactivity and the development of burrowing under low-energy hydrodynamic conditions. C) The ensuing sea-level fall produced accumulation of bioclasts
Journal Article
Journal: Elements
Published: 01 December 2018
Elements (2018) 14 (6): 385-390.
... the combination of trace metals interact with the ocean to regulate biological activity in new and surprising ways. Cobalt is the scarcest of all bioactive trace metals and, as such, is influenced the most strongly by complex internal cycling, which has a large impact on its oceanic distributions ( Saito et al...
FIGURES | View All (5)
Journal Article
Published: 01 January 2006
Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry (2006) 64 (1): 1-4.
... of neurodegenerative diseases ( Perl and Moalem 2006 ), the design of biocompatible, bioactive ceramics for use as orthopaedic and dental implants and related tissue engineering applications ( Cerruti and Sahai 2006 ) and the use of oxide-encapsulated living cells for the development of biosensors ( Livage and Coradin...
Journal Article
Published: 01 November 2003
American Mineralogist (2003) 88 (11-12): 1996-2006.
... that is usually more altered. Normally bioactivity is related to environmental conditions (i.e., moisture), glass composition (as this study clearly shows, where the K-rich glasses are the most selectively damaged), and textural characteristics (ruggedness, fissures, stings, bubbles, etc.). The silica-leaching...
FIGURES | View All (13)
Journal Article
Published: 01 December 2016
American Mineralogist (2016) 101 (12): 2594-2610.
... ; Dorozhkin 2012b ; Heimann 2013 , 2016 ). Much of the biocompatibility, bioactivity, and bioconductivity of bone arises from the surface properties of its crystallites. The surfaces contain not only ions of the dominant elements in the crystal lattice, but also minor ions such as Na + , K + , Mg 2...
FIGURES | View All (6)
Journal Article
Published: 01 August 2002
The Canadian Mineralogist (2002) 40 (4): 1237-1238.
... as a bioactive bone substitute in humans (p. 434). To sum up, Industrial Mineralogy is a fact-filled and well-organized reference on industrial minerals and rocks. Probably the book is unsuitable as a text. That aside, many of the references cited are to journals in ceramics, glass technology, metallurgy...
Journal Article
Journal: Elements
Published: 01 April 2008
Elements (2008) 4 (2): 97-104.
... approaches, i.e. biomimetic tissue engineering, replicate the structure and function of natural biocomposites. Porous and biodegradable scaffold materials are developed to act as temporary 3-D templates, which, when combined with bioactive materials, eventually gain full biological functionality and allow...
FIGURES | View All (7)