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Yellowstone-Absaroka area

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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 August 1956
AAPG Bulletin (1956) 40 (8): 1863–1898.
.... The known occurrence of dacitic vents deposits in Yellowstone Park suggests that the dacitic débris may have come from this area. The andesitic pebbles and cobbles may be reworked material of the early basic breccia, either in Yellowstone Park or the Absaroka Range, or both, transported for a distance...
FIGURES | View All (11)
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 September 1940
GSA Bulletin (1940) 51 (9): 1413–1428.
...JOHN T. ROUSE Abstract The volcanic rocks of the Southern Absaroka Mountains are a southern continuation of the early and late volcanic units of the northern Absaroka Volcanic Field. Explosive and flow breccias, tuffs, and volcanic conglomerates are the dominant rock types of this region...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 September 1937
GSA Bulletin (1937) 48 (9): 1257–1295.
...JOHN T. ROUSE Abstract INTRODUCTION PURPOSE OF STUDY AND PROBLEMS The purpose of this study is to determine the regional structure and tectonic history of the Absaroka Volcanic Field of northwestern Wyoming including the Absaroka Mountains and parts of Yellowstone National Park (Fig. 1...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 December 1961
GSA Bulletin (1961) 72 (12): 1749–1764.
...J. D LOVE Abstract Normal faults offset a bedrock surface scoured by Pleistocene ice in several areas within and south of Yellowstone National Park. Recurrent earthquake shocks and fresh appearance of some scarps suggest that movement is continuing along some faults. Four systems of faults...
Series: Clay Minerals Society Workshop Lectures, Clay Minerals Society Workshop Lectures
Published: 01 January 2010
DOI: 10.1346/CMS-WLS-17.2
EISBN: 9781881208372
... separates the more volatile constituents such as carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, mercury, and noble gases. The degree of separation depends on the pressure and temperature of boiling and on the constituent. One of the most dominant gases at Yellowstone and at most geothermal areas is carbon...
FIGURES | View All (16)
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 May 1985
AAPG Bulletin (1985) 69 (5): 844.
... seismic line traversing the North Fork Shoshone River, the northern area of the platform is dominated by structures radiating from the giant Sunlight volcanic center. This line shows that prospective sedimentary rocks and potential structural traps exist as far west as Yellowstone National Park. New...
Journal Article
Journal: Geosphere
Published: 08 December 2017
Geosphere (2018) 14 (1): 74–94.
... of primarily Cretaceous to Eocene Laramide tectonics, younger events have played a role in its formation, including Eocene Absaroka volcanism, Cenozoic lithospheric extension, and the migration of the North American plate over the Yellowstone hotspot tail. New 40 Ar/ 39 Ar ages coupled with existing K-Ar...
FIGURES | View All (13)
Journal Article
Published: 01 December 2019
Rocky Mountain Geology (2019) 54 (2): 47–95.
.../subsidence of the Teton Range and Jackson Hole, evolution of the Absaroka volcanic field, uplift of the Yellowstone Plateau, collapse of the central Sweetwater Arch, and opening of the Saratoga Basin. The enlarged reference view (in Fig. 2 ) shows that this study area (i.e., Figs. 3 and 4 ) is close...
FIGURES | View All (41)
Series: GSA Special Papers
Published: 01 January 1939
DOI: 10.1130/SPE20-p1
... This paper describes the geology of an area of approximately 430 square miles in northwestern Wyoming and includes the southern margin of the Absaroka Range, the western end of the Owl Creek Mountains, and the northwestern part of the Wind River Basin. Most of the area lies within the southern...
Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 February 2004
Geology (2004) 32 (2): 161–164.
... erosion was also significant. Some areas of extensive glaciation have compensation values to three times higher than other ranges. For example, compensation in the Sierra Nevada and Wind River Range is modest in comparison to compensation in the Yellowstone Plateau–Absaroka Range and San Juan Mountains...
FIGURES
Series: GSA Field Guide
Published: 01 January 2014
DOI: 10.1130/2014.0037(09)
EISBN: 9780813756370
... Plateau no longer contributed to the northern Yellowstone outlet glacier, and the glaciers from adjacent mountains (Beartooth uplift, Absaroka Range, and Gallatin Range) readjusted to this loss and established a stable ice margin that can be traced over much of the northern Yellowstone area. In full...
FIGURES | View All (10)
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 October 1958
AAPG Bulletin (1958) 42 (10): 2399–2423.
... of the Absaroka Mountain escarpment may be easily studied, saving the investigator the precipitous investigation of the higher divides. Source area for the Wiggins formation was undoubtedly the Yellowstone Park area. In the Wind River Basin proper (SE. 1 4 , NW. 1 4 , Sec. 32, T. 42...
FIGURES | View All (10)
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 April 1994
AAPG Bulletin (1994) 78 (4): 652–655.
... in the Cambrian shales, now tilted and deformed by later stages of uplift. In addition, the Cretaceous Livingston volcanic province is well developed near the western Beartooth Range. The Eocene Absaroka volcanic cover of the north and east parts of the Yellowstone plateau is also well known. Thus...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 March 1950
AAPG Bulletin (1950) 34 (3): 423–451.
...L. L. Sloss ABSTRACT The record of Paleozoic sedimentation in Montana and adjacent states and provinces reveals the influence of the tectonic framework of the area on the lithologic character, distribution, and thickness of the systems. Isopach and lithofacies maps of each system are presented...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 May 2018
American Mineralogist (2018) 103 (5): 757–775.
... document the mafic component in the rhyolitic magmatic system of the 2.08 Ma Huckleberry Ridge Tuff (HRT), Yellowstone, and compare it to mafic materials erupted prior to and following the HRT eruption in the area within and immediately around its associated caldera. The HRT eruption generated initial fall...
FIGURES | View All (11)
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 November 1955
AAPG Bulletin (1955) 39 (11): 2170–2210.
... sedimentation in the Black Hills area commenced somewhat later, preceding and accompanying the initial marine transgression on the Wyoming shelf. Widespread deposition of normal marine and fragmental oölitic limestones (mainly dolomitized equivalents in the shelf areas) occurred. Shoaling was prominent...
FIGURES | View All (12)
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 May 1983
AAPG Bulletin (1983) 67 (5): 725–743.
...W. J. Perry, Jr.; B. R. Wardlaw; N. H. Bostick; E. K. Maughan ABSTRACT The frontal thrust belt in the Lima area of southwestern Montana consists of blind (nonsurfacing) thrusts of the Lima thrust system beneath the Lima anticline and the Tendoy thrust sheet to the west. The Tendoy sheet involves...
FIGURES | View All (14)
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 November 1965
AAPG Bulletin (1965) 49 (11): 1878–1892.
..., and toward the latter part of this time interval fine-grained volcanic material was supplied from the Absaroka-Yellowstone region. By the end of the early Eocene, the basin fill lapped high onto the mountain flanks, and probably buried the Casper arch and some parts of the Owl Creek and Washakie Ranges ( Fig...
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Image
Figure 1. Gray-scale map of elastic thickness ( T  e ) in western United St...
in > Geology
Published: 01 February 2004
Figure 1. Gray-scale map of elastic thickness ( T e ) in western United States. Data are from Lowry et al. (2000) and Watts (2001) . Boundaries of glaciated areas are shown in white. Labeled ranges: SN (Sierra Nevada), SJ (San Juan), and YP-A (Yellowstone Plateau–Absaroka).
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 April 1957
AAPG Bulletin (1957) 41 (4): 591–626.
...” ( de Sitter, 1956 , pp. 187–89), is a more applicable designation in the genetic sense. Areal extent .—Remnants of the Heart Mountain thrust occur over a triangular area, about 30 miles wide and 60 miles long, with the apex of the triangle near the northeast corner of Yellowstone Park ( Figs. 1...
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