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Wyodak Deposit

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Journal Article
Published: 01 August 1988
Journal of the Geological Society (1988) 145 (4): 613–620.
... separated by deposits of contemporaneous, anastomosed channels. The channels and associated sediments maintained their position through time because they were confined by thick deposits of raised Wyodak-Anderson peat. In contrast, the Felix coal bed is interpreted to have formed as a raised but widespread...
Journal Article
Published: 01 January 2008
Rocky Mountain Geology (2008) 43 (2): 171–197.
..., and geographic location. The data indicate that the Upper Wyodak coal-zone aquifer in the Gillette and Schoonover areas in the eastern Powder River Basin appears to be a well-confined, combined sand and coal aquifer unit. In contrast, the Wyodak Rider coal zone aquifer may be only partially confined, allowing...
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Series: GSA Special Papers
Published: 01 January 1986
DOI: 10.1130/SPE210-p105
... Wyodak, Big George, and Felix are multibillion-ton coal deposits in Paleocene and Eocene rocks along the eastern flank of the Powder River Basin; they contain beds of subbituminous coal as much as 61 m (200 ft) thick, and average thicknesses are 30.5, 34, and 7.6 m (100, 113, and 25 ft...
Series: GSA Reviews in Engineering Geology
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.1130/2007.4118(10)
EISBN: 9780813758183
... into hillsides. Older, resistant clinker layers up to 60 m thick, formed by the burning of thick coal beds, cap summits and broad benches. Younger clinker rims, from thinner coals, form ledges on valley sides. ZHe ages of clinker, mainly from the Wyodak-anderson coal zone of the fort Union formation...
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Series: GSA Field Guide
Published: 01 January 2008
DOI: 10.1130/2007.fld010(01)
EISBN: 9780813756103
... of the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone in the Fort Union Formation are the primary coalbed methane reservoirs and deposits mined by the Wyodak mine. Names of coal beds and zones are based on U.S. Geological Survey nomenclature. In the mid-1960s, the Powder River Basin coal industry expanded production...
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Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 April 2003
Geology (2003) 31 (4): 303–306.
... rates of carbon accumulation in mires, we interpret the characteristic frequencies as resulting from precession and obliquity and their influence on oxidation and decay. Using the inferred precession component of the data to derive an internal time scale, we estimate that the Wyodak coal was deposited...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 May 1974
AAPG Bulletin (1974) 58 (5): 908–909.
... of surface mining. Geologic mapping and drill data indicate the presence of nearly a dozen individual coal beds of economic interest, parts of which are strippable. The Wyodak-Anderson coal bed is the deposit of greatest interest. This bed averages 50 to 100 ft in thickness in many places, lies less than 200...
Journal Article
Published: 01 December 2019
American Mineralogist (2019) 104 (12): 1806–1819.
... the Olympic Dam deposit, South Australia. They typically represent a family of paragenetically late replacement phases after pre-existing REE-bearing phosphates (fluorapatite, monazite, and xenotime). Characterization with respect to textures and composition allows two groups to be distinguished: Ca-Sr...
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Journal Article
Published: 06 October 2004
Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences (2004) 41 (10): 1159–1179.
... River Unit and deposits in the Clam Gulch, Diamond Creek, and Fox Creek areas. The new 40 Ar/ 39 Ar chronostratigraphic framework place the age of upper part of the Kenai Group strata between 4.6 and 9.4 Ma and support the 8-Ma interpretation of the boundary between the Homerian and Clamgulchian...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 January 2007
AAPG Bulletin (2007) 91 (1): 51–67.
... in the Paleocene Fort Union and Eocene Wasatch formations ( Figure 2 ). Most of the coal beds in the Wasatch Formation are continuous and thin (6 ft [1.8 m] or less), although locally, thicker deposits have been found ( De Bruin and Lyman, 1999 ). The Fort Union Formation extends more than 22,000 mi 2 (56,979,736...
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Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 October 2002
Geology (2002) 30 (10): 923–926.
... evidence that Sr isotope ratios can play an important role in evaluating the hydrologic effects of coal-bed methane development. In the Powder River Basin, the Paleocene Fort Union Formation and Eocene Wasatch Formation host large deposits of nonmarine, low-sulfur (<0.5%), subbituminous coals...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 August 1999
AAPG Bulletin (1999) 83 (8): 1207–1222.
... al., 1995 ). As much as 79% of this total is confined to basin provinces of the Rocky Mountain region, in which extensive deposits of Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary coals exist at depths ranging from 450 to 6500 ft (136 to 1970 m). A notable exception occurs in the Powder River basin...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 January 2006
Rocky Mountain Geology (2006) 41 (1): 29–43.
... of the Fort Union Formation (Paleocene in age) hosts the economically important coal deposits in the basin, estimated to be more than 550 billion short tons (499 billion metric tons) ( Fig. 1 ; Flores, 1999 ). In descending order, the coal beds include the Smith, Anderson, Big George, Canyon, Cook, Wall...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 January 2008
Rocky Mountain Geology (2008) 43 (2): 155–169.
... production in the PRB. The Fort Union Formation is overlain by the Eocene Wasatch Formation, which is exposed at the surface over much of the Wyoming part of the basin ( Bartos and Ogle, 2002 ). Both the Fort Union Formation and the Wasatch Formation were deposited in fluvial, lacustrine and swamp...
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Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 March 2009
Geology (2009) 37 (3): 255–258.
... stream incision since the Pliocene ( McMillan et al., 2006 ), but constraints on the timing and rates of erosion are limited. Volcanic ash deposits in river terraces provide snapshots of former landscapes ( Dethier, 2001 ), but these layers are rare and become degraded through time. Cosmogenic exposure...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 August 2005
American Mineralogist (2005) 90 (8-9): 1434–1441.
...) and Novak and Jansa (1997) . Rasmussen (1996) found APS minerals in marine-deposited sandstones, principally rimming detrital grains, formed during early diagenesis by sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. T able 2. Electron microprobe analyses of representative alumino-phosphate-sulfate...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 December 2008
Environmental Geosciences (2008) 15 (4): 153–171.
..., particularly sodium and sulfate species (for example, thenardite) ( Brinck and Frost, 2007a ). Drever and Smith (1978) showed that the occasional heavy rains in arid basins will partially redissolve the salts deposited in the soil and vadose zone, and the composition of this water will be dominated by sodium...
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Journal Article
Journal: Geophysics
Published: 02 May 2008
Geophysics (2008) 73 (3): B77–B84.
... deposited in fluvial systems fed by ancestral uplifts ( Flores, 1986 ). The production target within the study area is the Anderson coal bed, which is part of the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone of the Fort Union Formation and occurs approximately 230 m below the surface. The Powder River flows...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 April 2003
AAPG Bulletin (2003) 87 (4): 667–676.
... quantitative as well as comparative perspectives, both judged useful for this topic. Water-quality conditions for the six producing basins are described, with emphasis on the similarities of relative chemical concentrations in both marine and nonmarine depositional environments. Discussion of the geochemical...
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Journal Article
Published: 26 October 2010
Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences (2010) 47 (11): 1427–1443.
... on Pe-Piper et al. 1990 and other sources in text). The Lower Cretaceous Chaswood Formation was deposited in terrestrial basins in Nova Scotia at the same time as volcanic activity to the west and southeast. This study searched for evidence of volcanic ash in the Chaswood Formation, principally...