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Wabash Valley seismic zone

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Journal Article
Published: 23 February 2021
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (2021) 111 (2): 1154–1179.
...Ronald C. Counts; Roy Van Arsdale; Edward Woolery; Madhav K. Murari; Lewis A. Owen; E. Glynn Beck; Shannon Mahan; James Durbin ABSTRACT The Wabash Valley seismic zone (WVSZ) is a region of diffuse, modern intraplate seismicity in the central United States with a history of strong, late Quaternary...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 September 2002
Seismological Research Letters (2002) 73 (5): 660–686.
...John H. McBride; Thomas G. Hildenbrand; William J. Stephenson; Christopher J. Potter Abstract Reprocessing of seismic-reflection data reveals new images of upper- to middle-crustal structures beneath the Wabash Valley seismic zone, located north of the New Madrid seismic zone within the seismically...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 September 2002
Seismological Research Letters (2002) 73 (5): 751–761.
... area has experienced repeated large earthquakes during Holocene time. In the last 200 years, historic records indicate many small and intermediate-size earthquakes, including some events that were damaging, have occurred throughout the Wabash Valley seismic zone ( Nuttli, 1979 ). This zone, which...
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Journal Article
Published: 23 September 2015
Seismological Research Letters (2015) 86 (6): 1730–1736.
...Timothy H. Larson; Andrew C. Phillips; Scott D. Elrick ABSTRACT The Meadow Bank ( MB ) is a 10-km-long and 5- to 7-m-high linear scarp in glacial sediments, trending north-northeast along the west edge of the Wabash River Valley in southeast Illinois. The MB is within the Wabash Valley seismic zone...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Published: 01 September 2010
Seismological Research Letters (2010) 81 (5): 699–714.
...Gerald A. Galgana; Michael W. Hamburger The Wabash Valley seismic zone (WVSZ) is a broad, seismically active area located in southern Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and westernmost Kentucky. Situated within the WVSZ is the Wabash Valley fault system (WVFS), a series of parallel NNE-trending...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 October 2006
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (2006) 96 (5): 1718–1728.
... 4/27/1996 MUM/WABASH 0.01 5/7/1996 MUM/WABASH 0.12 5/19/1996 MUM/WABASH 0.16 There is a growing concern about the potential for destructive earthquakes in the Wabash Valley seismic zone of southern Indiana, Illinois, and western Kentucky. In the past two decades, important new...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 November 2005
Seismological Research Letters (2005) 76 (6): 756–771.
...Scott M. Olson; Russell A. Green; Stephen F. Obermeier Abstract Seismic hazard assessment in the central United States, and in particular the Wabash Valley seismic zone of Indiana-Illinois, frequently relies on empirical estimates of paleoearthquake magnitudes ( M ). In large part these estimates...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 September 2004
Seismological Research Letters (2004) 75 (5): 637–641.
...Ron L. Street; Robert A. Bauer; Edward W. Woolery Abstract The moment magnitude determination for prehistorical earthquakes in the Wabash Valley seismic zone traditionally has relied on modified magnitude-bound liquefaction curves. The calibration of the moment magnitude and maximum distance...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Published: 01 October 2003
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (2003) 93 (5): 2201–2211.
... 7 km depth, without significantly changing their orientation. The June 2002 event at 18 km depth and the south-central Illinois earthquake on 9 November 1968 ( m w 5.3), which occurred at 25 km depth, suggest that the seismogenic depth in the Wabash Valley seismic zone extends down to at least 18 km...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 November 2010
Seismological Research Letters (2010) 81 (6): 951–954.
...Miguel Merino; Seth Stein; Mian Liu; Emile A. Okal © 2010 by the Seismological Society of America 2010 The Wabash Valley seismic zone in southern Illinois and Indiana is a northeastern extension of the New Madrid seismic zone ( Figure 1 ). Like New Madrid, the Wabash zone is underlain...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: Geophysics
Published: 01 March 1986
Geophysics (1986) 51 (3): 640–660.
...John L. Sexton; L. W. Braile; William J. Hinze; M. J. Campbell Abstract Sixty-eight kilometers of 12-fold seismic reflection data were collected in the Wabash River Valley of southwestern Indiana and southeastern Illinois to investigate the configuration of a basement structure inferred from...
Image
Proposed alternatives to the <span class="search-highlight">Wabash</span> <span class="search-highlight">Valley</span> <span class="search-highlight">seismic</span> <span class="search-highlight">zone</span> of  Figure 3 . The ...
Published: 01 September 2002
Figure 7. Proposed alternatives to the Wabash Valley seismic zone of Figure 3 . The heavy, solid, black lines outline the extension of the boundary between the continental rim and the craton to include the Grayville and Rough Creek grabens (compare Figure 1 ; see text). Heavy, dashed, gray
Journal Article
Published: 01 September 2002
Seismological Research Letters (2002) 73 (5): 762–775.
...Michael W. Hamburger; Vladimir Rybakov; Anthony Lowry; Bingming Shen-Tu; John A. Rupp Abstract Observations from a new high-precision GPS geodetic network in the southern Illinois basin provide evidence for present-day tectonic strain in the Wabash Valley seismic zone, an area associated...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 July 1997
Seismological Research Letters (1997) 68 (4): 521–536.
... exceeds the largest historic earthquake of M 5.5 that has originated in Indiana and Illinois. The strongest prehistoric earthquakes have been centered in the general vicinity of strongest historic seismicity, in and near the Wabash Valley seismic zone in the lower Wabash Valley of Indiana and Illinois...
Journal Article
Published: 05 October 2016
Seismological Research Letters (2016) 87 (6): 1479–1486.
...Daniel Brazitis; James A. Conder ABSTRACT Within the Illinois basin, the northern Wabash Valley seismic zone ( WVSZ ) and adjoining La Salle anticlinal belt have produced three moderate‐sized earthquakes ranging from m b 4.7 to m b 5.2 in the past 50 years. However, few smaller events from...
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Image
▴ (A) Frequency-magnitude plots for New Madrid and <span class="search-highlight">Wabash</span> <span class="search-highlight">Valley</span> <span class="search-highlight">seismic</span> zo...
Published: 01 November 2010
Figure 2. ▴ (A) Frequency-magnitude plots for New Madrid and Wabash Valley seismic zones and (B) comparison of these zones with the Central U.S. zones, both including and excluding the New Madrid and Wabash zones.
Journal Article
Published: 01 June 2011
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (2011) 101 (3): 1039–1054.
...Jennifer S. Haase; Yoon Seok Choi; Tim Bowling; Robert L. Nowack Abstract Evansville, Indiana, is one of the closest large urban areas to both the New Madrid Seismic Zone, where large earthquakes occurred in 1811–1812, and the Wabash Valley Seismic Zone, where there is evidence of several large...
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Series: GSA Reviews in Engineering Geology
Published: 01 January 1979
DOI: 10.1130/REG4-p65
EISBN: 9780813758046
... (observed for an earthquake of m b = 3.8), but their magnitude and area of perceptibility will be small. With the exception of the New Madrid seismic zone and possibly the Wabash Valley seismic zone, a conservatively reasonable value for the maximum body-wave magnitude to be expected in the major seismic...
Journal Article
Published: 01 May 2010
Environmental & Engineering Geoscience (2010) 16 (2): 143–162.
...JAE-WON CHUNG; J DAVID ROGERS Abstract The St. Louis metropolitan area is the focus of the U.S. Geological Survey's Earthquake Hazard Program's plan for assessing the likely risks of an earthquake emanating from the New Madrid Seismic Zone or the Wabash Valley Seismic Zone, which are the most...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 April 1991
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (1991) 81 (2): 423–445.
...C. J. Langer; G. A. Bollinger Abstract The 10 June 1987 southeastern Illinois earthquake ( m bLg = 5.2) was the seventh in a series of moderate magnitude (≧ 4.5) MMI VII shocks to occur in the Wabash Valley seismic zone of southeastern Illinois and southwestern Indiana since 1891. Located about 200...